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2009 UK 50p Coin Blue Peter and 2018 Royal Mint Experience Newton Strike Your Own 50p coin


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UK 50p coin in circulation the rarest ones.

Two 50p coins we are going to cover here, 2009 50p Blue Peter coin and 2018 50p Newton coin. 2009 50p Kew Gardens coin is used up against the two coins mentioned to see what is the rare coin within 50p group. In order to present a best picture of UK the rarest 50p coin in circulation, we must firstly define two base lines of term of rarity in 50p coin: a). mintage and b). statue of a coin: in current circulation where the coin is not out of date in decimalisation system. Therefore, we can talk more on a same topic.

Scenario I and II are used to illustrate the two base lines mentioned above, and a table follows behind each scenario case.

Scenario I: consider mintage only!
A mintage figure is highly and naturally connected with a coin where it is minted to put in place for daily use by a Minter. It is really hard to say how many coins a mint need to prepare, because demand is really hard to predict, due to many factors involved and cashless is getting more clear in our daily life in post-pandemic period.

In this part, we are going to list the rarest 50p coin as below:

Table A: UK the rarest 50p coin by mintage from 1971 to present
Name Year Mintage Note
Single Market EEC 1992/93 109,000 30.00mm & 16.00g
Kew Gardens 2009 210,000 27.30mm & 8.00g
Blue Peter 2009 19,751 no official figure, in folder
Isaac Newton 2018 20,826 Royal Mint Experience folder
Source: created by richukcoins® on 13/08/2020.

Scenario II: consider mintage upon statue of a coin. This is the way the Royal Mint used.

Table B: UK the rarest 50p coin by hype from 1997 to present
Name Year Mintage Note
Kew Gardens 2009 210,000 27.30mm & 8.00g
Blue Peter 2009 19,751 no official figure, in folder
Isaac Newton 2018 20,826 Royal Mint experience folder
Source: created by richukcoins® on 13/08/2020.

Table A & B are two very interesting tables. This is because Table A is a full picture of reflecting UK 50p coin over time, and Table B however just shows partially. At the moment, people or collectors are spending over £400 on a Kew in folder. What about a Blue Peter??? This is really a good question to be asked ourself. We all are driven by the Royal Mint marketing strategy.

Let we have a look what do they look like in terms of Blue Peter and Newton SYO (2018).

  • 2009 UK 50p coin Blue Peter
  • coming soon……

  • 2018 Royal Mint Experience Newton 50p coin Strike Your Own (SYO)

Please, donot get confused with 2017 Newton 50p coin. The reason you are going to see a 2018 Newton 50p coin is because the Mint have to use/create a thing (/or things) to marketing the Royal Mint Experience where they spent a lot time to build. Furthermore, 50p coin was becoming a hot potato between 2016 and 2017 in the UK. Therefore, that is the reason of the birth of 2018 Newton 50p coin. Yes, donot forget that 2018 Newton 50p coin is a coin that you strike it on your own (ie., Strike Your Own = SYO) at the Royal Mint Experience. This makes 2009 50p Blue Peter coin and 2018 50p Newton SYO coin a little bit different in nature.

2009 50p Blue Peter coin and 2018 50p Newton SYO coin are both rare in terms of mintage and qualified by the term of currently circulating. So, collectors, are you going to pay price over the roof on a 2009 50p Kew Gardens coin? Answers are already in you mind after this read. Mission still carries on. However, we will not know which one will be the next rarest 50p coin. Life expects many uncertainty, keep positive.

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N95 Particulate Filtering Facepiece Respirator and the Virus crisis 2020


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N95 and the Virus crisis in the UK

I know it is hard to believe seeing an article like this here. It is totally unrelated to any coins. However, I wanted to use this space and opportunity to save our the NHS system and its staff. Therefore, this is bit I can do.

N95 Particulate Filtering Facepiece Respirator (i.e., N95 face masks) is a standard term on face masks named by the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) in the USA. According to CDC, a N95 facepiece respirator is able to filter at least 95% of airborne particles, but unable to resist to oil. The standard of N95 was established in place after the Sars crisis in 2003/04. In Europe, there is three standards in terms of N95 style respirator, FFP1, FFP2 and FFP3. Because the FFP1 standard is extremely lower than the N95 standard, we will not cover it here. FFP stands for Filtering Face Piece and 1/2/3 donates the level of protection. a FFP2-graded respirator is equivalent to a N95 facepiece respirator and FFP3 is the highest grade (i.e., >99%) in its kind. For example, our NHS frontline staff must wear a FFP3 respirator associated with Personal Protection Equipment (PPE) to cope with patients.

Right now, the government has published social distancing (i.e., at least 2 meters between each) to isolate or delay the pandemic. It is not enough to stop this crisis. For instance, if you go to shopping, you are well aware the distance while you are waiting in a queue, but how many people are aware of the 2-meter distance when you are choosing products on shelves? However, this is time to spread the virus if you pass by a person who is potentially carrying the virus but insignificant to show symptoms. The virus can come to you through the air in a very short distance. In this scenario, a N95/ (at least) FFP2 face mask is required. A face mask is able to filter other particles in the air and give you very good quality air to breathe. You can imagine that if you are doing underwater activity without a breath, hard to survive, but give you scuba diving cylinder to use (i.e., oxygen), you swim like a fish in the water.

The pandemic crisis was started in very early Jan of 2020 in China (a few first cases confirmed in Wuhan China in the end of Dec 2019, due to information strictly delayed and/or unrevealed online), all either N95 or above FFP2 masks were OUT of STOCK in China and people were sourcing all possible face masks in Europe and the USA back to China during the periods of Jan and Feb. All factory orders in China has been in a long queue to March at the beginning of Feb 2020. The shortage of face masks in the world, we have to thank globalisation and Chinese purchasing power on all N95 and above. This tells us that Chinese people first thought was to use face masks to isolate and delay the spread of the virus. Very good example, please see Taiwan and Singapore. I have to say that Taiwan is not recognised by the WHO, but they really do a good job during the Sars and the Sars-COV-2 crisis, especially face mask supply domestic and the virus control strategy. Coronavirus information from Taiwan please see here.

In terms of the virus, I am really confused about its name. At the beginning of the pandemic crisis, not even called pandemic by the WHO, it was called the novel-Coronavirus-2019 (i.e., the 2019-nCOV or see PHE information 2019-nCOV). Later soon, it was officially named COVID-19 by the WHO. Sometimes, you probably see the Sars-COV-2 term. I believe that its proper name has not yet in place. We, as human being, will have to ponder what was going on in the past! Somehow, the WHO information has mislead all countries in the world. More information about the virus you can see from the Lancet.

Disclaimer:
All above, it only stands author’s personal view, other entity will not be held responsible for any inaccuracies.


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Britain 2020 Brexit 50p Coin from the Royal Mint


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31 January 2020, Brexit 50p Coin

From a road map of EU,
a article written by the BBC is the best place to know and discovery, please have a read link, a road map of the Brexit by BBC.

From coin side,

  1. 1973, UK 50p coin the EEC (hand in hand)
  2. 1973 EEC1973 EEC

  3. 1992, UK 50p coin the Single market
  4. 1992/93 the Single Market1992/93 the Single Market

  5. 1998, UK 50p coin the 25th Anniversary of the EEC
  6. 1998 EEC1998 EEC

  7. 2020, UK 50p coin the Brexit
  8. B01B02

    B03B04

    As you have seen above, it is very simple and basic package sold by the Royal Mint at £10 each plus delivery fee. It is hard to see what is WORTH of £10 really? Yes, one thing you have to admit that if you have not done anything on the day (31/01/2020), it would not be a record in our modern history. From this point, you contribute your £10 into the history. In terms of coin quality, it is still a prooflike finish standard. One more thing, from the road map of coins since 1973 to 2020, is that all story about the relationship between EU and the UK are all in place and all recorded on British modern coinage. Farewell the European Union, and Good luck to the UK.

    • 2020, UK 50p silver proof coin the Brexit
    • Note: a commemorative coin, supporting from a). a 47,000 issue limit = 47 years’ relationship with the European Union; & b). struck in precious metal like silver and gold. A label on outer packaging makes me thinking about “why” the payments were made on 31/01/2020, and then cancelled by the Royal Mint. Here you go. All coins scheduled on sale were the day, 31/01/2020, this doesnot necessarily mean that the manufacture was able to delivery goods on the day. I know the Royal Mint is endorsed by their brand & 1000 years history, and the Treasury (ie., a Treasury-owned company). But if, the Royal Mint were collapsed in a second (like Lehman Brothers in 2008), another Ponzi Scheme was on. However, who really cares?

    • 2020, UK 50p coin 2-coin the Brexit
    • B05B06

      Note: a combined pack of a 1973 coin and a 2020 coin, it covers 47 years that the relationship lasts between EU and the UK, and a limit of mintage is set up at 5,000 coins, much better than silver coin of this kind.

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The Pobjoy Mint Die Mark (Single) A/B/C/D/E in 1973


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The Pobjoy Mint Die Mark (Single) A/B/C/D/E in 1973

I have talked a little bit on the topic of die mark AC in the past, catching it up you can click on Die Marks AC under All Categories on your right panel. Today, let we talk about single die mark, and the start of all die mark variants.

It all begun on sovereigns gold coins in 1973. In the year 1973, the Pobjoy mint were commissioned to mint sovereigns from half to five sovereigns on behalf of the government of Isle of Man. Also, it was the time to see the birth of die mark (single) A/B/C/D/E from a private mint in the post-decimal era in the UK. A special die mark X was created in 1973 and die mark F in 1979. In the meantime, the letters of PM were well-established as the Pobjoy Mint’s mintmark.

According to MacKay (1978, p.51), a single letter like A/B/C/D/E was stamped on IOM sovereigns from half to Five in 1973, and each letter indicated the numbers of coins struck from each die. However, the author has not put more information about the difference among dies, or gave explanation on reasons behind using different dies. Most importantly, this book was published by the Pobjoy Mint.

In terms of a single letter,
Precious metal, (–0)*, single die mark like: A, B, C, D & E, X (only 1973 gold metal, MacKay (1978, p.52)) and F (1979 silver metal);
Man-made metal, (–1)*, 2-digit die mark like AA/AB/AC/AD and BB/BC on 1978 £1 Virenium coin;
Base metal, (–2)*, 2-digit die mark like: AA/AB/AC/AD/AE(?)/AF(?) under the Prefix A, and BB/BC/BD/BE/BF and BA (1988 50p Xmas coin) under the Prefix B** on 1979 50p CN coin.
The difference among above like 2^0(=1) and 2^1(=2, two different finish standards) and 2^2 (=4, Tynwald Hill, a 4-tiered hill). The base 2 comes from a coin having two sides.
The meaning of 2-digit die mark represents the First Day of Minting (FDM) like AA and BB in base metal, B in precious metal.
*Note: considers as position in line.
**Note: AE, AF, BE and BF were only appeared on circulating commemorative coins like IOM Xmas 50p coin, and not on circulating coins. DD was spotted on 1980 circulating coins. Also, the Prefix B indicates a (at least) prooflike or proof finish standard. This source comes from 50p coins.

Having said above, it is easy to direct how to collect IOM Xmas 50p coin and IOM T.T. 50p coin in terms of die mark. In general, coins in loose condition, die marks AA and BB both from circulating commemorative coins are the most common ones but AA with BU striking techniques and BB with Diamond Finish striking techniques. Years like 1980 1981 1982 1983 1984 until 1985 it is hard to decide which direction you are going to, because there is 4 (at least) variants from the Prefix A and the Prefix B and later after post-1997, down to AA/BB (or ND).

Some special IOM/T.T. 50p ones without provenance at the moment, like:

  1. 1980 IOM Xmas,
  2. it has BB/BC/BD/BE/BF & BF mule plus two different versions under die letters BB–BB w/ mirror-liked field and BB w/o mirror-liked field, and AA/AB/AC/AD/AE(?)/AF(?). Mistakes noted! Very new product from the perspective of the Mint alongside circulating coins. Official announcement of BC as diamond finish in Krause book (KM#).

  3. 1981 IOM Xmas XX,
  4. this one is possibly linked to 1973 sovereign with die mark X. It has BB and BC under the Prefix B this year. In the same year, IOM T.T. was minted. Mistake noted! New product from the perspective of the Mint alongside circulating coins.

  5. 1983 IOM T.T. AC,
  6. it has AA/AB/AC/AD and BB.

  7. 1988 IOM Xmas BA,
  8. this one indicates that BA coin finish standard is between AA and BB. The BB die marks indicate proof finish, and the AA die marks stand for standard finish. Somehow it echoes 1980 BB w/o mirror-liked field in terms of striking quality.

  9. In 1994 IOM Xmas ND,
  10. Striking techniques are totally different.

  11. 2005 IOM Xmas AA,
  12. is shiny like a glass cup.

  13. 2011 IOM Xmas AA,
  14. and ND are only two grades in Xmas series. BB die marks has dropped out since 2004 onwards.

Let us talk about the AC and AD die marks once again here. It has been talking many times in the past, but here it definitively gives you the best picture you can see. Also, you can find them from Die Marks AC/ AD under Categories on your right panel. The AD die mark was established alongside with the AC die mark in 1978 for the purpose of celebrating the first £1 pound coin in British decimal coinage history. The standard finish (i.e., UNC finish) was used on £1 IOM virenium coin from sequence of A to D under the Prefix A. In the year 1979, it only had the AA/AB/AC die marks on £1 virenium coin. However, the AD die mark was spotted on 1979 IOM 50p coin. Most surprisingly, this year 50p coin finish on the AA/AB/AC/AD die marks was significant different, and each die mark had two variants (note, another 1979 AC from 1980 AC). Probably, all steps above were included in the “1972 workable proposal” submitted in 1972 by Mr. D. Pobjoy.

Have you noticed that the AD die mark was shifted from £1 down to 50p? This obviously echoes the Millennium AD event and the Royal visit event in 1979.

It was a amazing story told by the different die marks, but sadly, it had no any official record of them to trace or search. Probably, it is the best disadvantage of collecting IOM post-decimal coin.

Reference
MacKay, J.A., 1978. The Pobjoy Mint Encyclopaedia of Isle of Man Coins and Tokens. 2nd ed. Dumfries, England: The Pobjoy Mint.

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