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The Pobjoy Mint Die Mark (Single) A/B/C/D/E in 1973


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The Pobjoy Mint Die Mark (Single) A/B/C/D/E in 1973

I have talked a little bit on the topic of die mark AC in the past, catching it up you can click on Die Marks AC under All Categories on your right panel. Today, let we talk about single die mark, and the start of all die mark variants.

It all begun on sovereigns gold coins in 1973. In the year 1973, the Pobjoy mint were commissioned to mint sovereigns from half to five sovereigns on behalf of the government of Isle of Man. Also, it was the time to see the birth of die mark (single) A/B/C/D/E from a private mint in the post-decimal era in the UK. A special die mark X was created in 1973 and die mark F in 1979. In the meantime, the letters of PM were well-established as the Pobjoy Mint’s mintmark.

According to MacKay (1978, p.51), a single letter like A/B/C/D/E was stamped on IOM sovereigns from half to Five in 1973, and each letter indicated the numbers of coins struck from each die. However, the author has not put more information about the difference among dies, or gave explanation on reasons behind using different dies. Most importantly, this book was published by the Pobjoy Mint.

In terms of a single letter,
Precious metal, (–0)*, single die mark like: A, B, C, D & E, X (only 1973 gold metal, MacKay (1978, p.52)) and F (1979 silver metal);
Man-made metal, (–1)*, 2-digit die mark like AA/AB/AC/AD and BB/BC on 1978 £1 Virenium coin;
Base metal, (–2)*, 2-digit die mark like: AA/AB/AC/AD/AE(?)/AF(?) under the Prefix A, and BB/BC/BD/BE/BF and BA (1988 50p Xmas coin) under the Prefix B** on 1979 50p CN coin.
The difference among above like 2^0(=1) and 2^1(=2, two different finish standards) and 2^2 (=4, Tynwald Hill, a 4-tiered hill). The base 2 comes from a coin having two sides.
The meaning of 2-digit die mark represents the First Day of Minting (FDM) like AA and BB in base metal, B in precious metal.
*Note: considers as position in line.
**Note: AE, AF, BE and BF were only appeared on circulating commemorative coins like IOM Xmas 50p coin, and not on circulating coins. DD was spotted on 1980 circulating coins. Also, the Prefix B indicates a (at least) prooflike or proof finish standard. This source comes from 50p coins.

Having said above, it is easy to direct how to collect IOM Xmas 50p coin and IOM T.T. 50p coin in terms of die mark. In general, coins in loose condition, die marks AA and BB both from circulating commemorative coins are the most common ones but AA with BU striking techniques and BB with Diamond Finish striking techniques. Years like 1980 1981 1982 1983 1984 until 1985 it is hard to decide which direction you are going to, because there is 4 (at least) variants from the Prefix A and the Prefix B and later after post-1997, down to AA/BB (or ND).

Some special IOM/T.T. 50p ones without provenance at the moment, like:

  1. 1980 IOM Xmas,
  2. it has BB/BC/BD/BE/BF & BF mule plus two different versions under die letters BB–BB w/ mirror-liked field and BB w/o mirror-liked field, and AA/AB/AC/AD/AE(?)/AF(?). Mistakes noted! Very new product from the perspective of the Mint alongside circulating coins. Official announcement of BC as diamond finish in Krause book (KM#).

  3. 1981 IOM Xmas XX,
  4. this one is possibly linked to 1973 sovereign with die mark X. It has BB and BC under the Prefix B this year. In the same year, IOM T.T. was minted. Mistake noted! New product from the perspective of the Mint alongside circulating coins.

  5. 1983 IOM T.T. AC,
  6. it has AA/AB/AC/AD and BB.

  7. 1988 IOM Xmas BA,
  8. this one indicates that BA coin finish standard is between AA and BB. The BB die marks indicate proof finish, and the AA die marks stand for standard finish. Somehow it echoes 1980 BB w/o mirror-liked field in terms of striking quality.

  9. In 1994 IOM Xmas ND,
  10. Striking techniques are totally different.

  11. 2005 IOM Xmas AA,
  12. is shiny like a glass cup.

  13. 2011 IOM Xmas AA,
  14. and ND are only two grades in Xmas series. BB die marks has dropped out since 2004 onwards.

Let us talk about the AC and AD die marks once again here. It has been talking many times in the past, but here it definitively gives you the best picture you can see. Also, you can find them from Die Marks AC/ AD under Categories on your right panel. The AD die mark was established alongside with the AC die mark in 1978 for the purpose of celebrating the first £1 pound coin in British decimal coinage history. The standard finish (i.e., UNC finish) was used on £1 IOM virenium coin from sequence of A to D under the Prefix A. In the year 1979, it only had the AA/AB/AC die marks on £1 virenium coin. However, the AD die mark was spotted on 1979 IOM 50p coin. Most surprisingly, this year 50p coin finish on the AA/AB/AC/AD die marks was significant different, and each die mark had two variants (note, another 1979 AC from 1980 AC). Probably, all steps above were included in the “1972 workable proposal” submitted in 1972 by Mr. D. Pobjoy.

Have you noticed that the AD die mark was shifted from £1 down to 50p? This obviously echoes the Millennium AD event and the Royal visit event in 1979.

It was a amazing story told by the different die marks, but sadly, it had no any official record of them to trace or search. Probably, it is the best disadvantage of collecting IOM post-decimal coin.

Reference
MacKay, J.A., 1978. The Pobjoy Mint Encyclopaedia of Isle of Man Coins and Tokens. 2nd ed. Dumfries, England: The Pobjoy Mint.

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Isle of Man Tourist Trophy (T.T.) 50p Standard Finish and Diamond Finish Coins from 1981 to 2016


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Isle of Man Tourist Trophy 50p Diamond Finish and Standard Finish Coin



First of all, this topic is all about circulating and/or circulating commemorative 50p cupronickel (i.e. base metal, silver in colour; 75:25 copper to nickel ratio) coins from the Isle of Man especially the Tourist Trophy (i.e., T.T.) events on the island. More clearly, we are going to split this chapter into two subparts. One part it is about to talk standard finish 50p coin in terms of uncirculated grade. Another part will direct us to diamond finish 50p coin in terms of prooflike grade. Meanwhile, you can find out what are so-called a “diamond finish” 50p coin. All then-standard and diamond finish TT 50p coins are solely minted by the British Pobjoy Mint® which is a private limited company (hereafter the Mint or PM) on behalf of the government of the Isle of Man (Tynwald, note Tynwald you need to see Viking Boats 50ps article) from 1981 to 2016.

Normally, a standard finish IOM 50p coin with only one strike that gives a complete finish on base metal has the purpose to serve people daily use on the island. Therefore, Manx collectors can easily find a 50p coin through their daily life. All standard finish 50p coins are most minted associated with “AA” on its reverse (note AA originally called the production batch codes). For some particular cases, it may appear “AB”/”AC”/”AD” under the A batch (or Prefix A) in the T.T. series, or more special cases AA appears on silver metal. Other single die mark like B, C, D (or E or F) represents precious metals. You will have less information here. Collectors normally call them as die marks (or die letters, interchangeable). They are definitely meant some information internally. Sadly, we can tell you nothing at the moment. Based on my experience, die letters tell me that may indicate many different types of mirrors associated with different striking pressures, times of striking, etc. Why do we see such difference of the die letters among coins? It is a good point to raise. However, it never ever concludes a convincible answer, even from the Mint itself.

Diamond finish 50p coins are specially created by the Mint for the purpose of producing higher standard quality on commemorative coins to serious collectors. The concept of “diamond finish” was invented by the Mint in early 1980s (note I personally think the term was derived from “diamond cut”, because the first mint-master has very strong background of jewellery). What is a coin with a “diamond finish”? In terms of a diamond finish, it is highly likely ProofLike (i.e., PL, no official confirmation) coin (e.g., 1980 IOM Xmas 50p BC coins). More information related to PL can be seen below. Bearing in mind that all diamond finish 50p coins come with die letters “BB” on reverse and a cert (e.g., it includes IOM T.T./IOM Xmas/some IOM Viking boats) originally. Interestingly, some diamond 50p coins in the T.T series come with NO “BB” when minted in late 1990s onwards. The techniques (for instance, matte mirror, reflectivity etc) used on diamond 50p coins are very detailed and enjoyable when you hold and look at it. Because the mirrored-field (or mirror-liked field) has higher reflectivity than a normal standard 50p coin but slightly lower than any proof base metal coins made by the Mint. Last, all T.T. 50p coins you are going to see within this chapter are made of cupronickel (Copper-3/4, Nickel-1/4 and appears silver in colour).

“Prooflike (PL) coins appear to look like proof coins but in reality have not been produced using the special proof process. This may include mirrored fields and cameo devices. The scale donates the proper designation for the coin, based on reflectivity, 2 to 4 inches of reflectivity; devices must be frosted.” 2 elements of prooflike coin: polished blanks are used to strike coins, and no proof dies used for mirror-liked field and frosted relief.
– pcgs.com

“For instance, PCGS notes that Prooflike Morgan dollars require ‘clear reflection in the fields on both sides from 2-4 inches away.’ The grading company states that a hazy effect or streaks may impede the reflectivity, generally indicating a semi-prooflike condition (which does not appear on the PCGS label).”
– pcgs.com

Having said a little about a prooflike finish above, it is time to reveal what the T.T. 50p coins look like now. In this part below, it contains two parts. Part I: it is the pre-1997 section (i.e., 1969 to 1997 echoes British coinage changes, 50p coins were 30.00mm in diameter and 13.50g in weight) and Part II: it is the post-1997 section (i.e., 1997 to date, 50p coins are resized to 27.30mm in diameter and 8.00g in weight).

Part I
In total, six T.T. 50p coins exist before 1997. They are: four T.T. 50p coins from 1981 to 1984) plus two T.T. related (ie., TTF1) 50p coins between 1996 and 1997 (note, by 30.00mm in diameter, therefore 6 in total, or by 27.30mm in diameter it is 7 in total. It all depends on the way how you count them). More details for each coin are as follows:

  1. 1981 T.T. commemorates 1980 winner–Joey Dunlop & Yamaha motor. Mintage 100,000 standard finish coins (AA/AB) & 30,000 diamond finish coins (BB).
  2. 1982 T.T. commemorates 1981 winner–Mike Grant & Suzuki motor. Mintage 100,000 (assumed) standard finish coins (AA) & 30,000 diamond finish coins (BB).
  3. 1983 T.T. commemorates 1982 winner–Ron Haslam & Honda motor. Mintage 100,000 standard finish coins (AA/AB/AC/AD) & 30,000 diamond finish coins (BB).
  4. 1984 T.T. commemorates the Sidecar T.T. nine times winner–Mike Boddice. Mintage 100,000 (assumed) standard finish coins (AA) & 30,000 diamond finish coins (BB).
  5. 1996 commemorates Philip McCallen Great achievement in 1996. Unknown mintage for both standard finish coins (AA) & diamond finish coins (NO die letters).
  6. 1997 commemorates Philip McCallen Great achievement in 1996. Unknown mintage for standard finish coins (AA, 30mm in diameter).
  7. 1997 commemorates Philip McCallen Great achievement in 1996. Unknown mintage for standard finish coins (AA, 27.30mm in diameter).

More specifically, 1981 Joey Dunlop
1981 T.T. 50p coin in pictures,
Note
Obverse designer A. Machin
Machine: Yamaha (747)
TT on top of the reverse
Circulating Commemorative issue (AA) and commemorative issue (BB)

  • 1981 TT 50p Diamond Finish BB coin w/o error
  • 1981 TT 50p standard finish AA coin w/ error
  • 1981 TT 50p standard finish AB coin w/ error
  • 1981 TT 50p standard finish AB coin
  • Variation on 1981 Misspelling Error Coins, Note “RACING” only on AB die mark and BB die mark coins. However, it makes a controversial point between AA die mark and BB die mark in terms of FDM. If no any controversy involved, BB die mark lost the FDM function on IOM TT 50p DF coin, and BB die mark only left with meaning of a diamond finish.

It is clearly seeing that the Mint really made a mistake when they produced 50ps of first the T.T. theme in 1981 (seen from pictures below). But they did not fully realise the “spelling” was an issue seriously, and not negotiate with other party properly before striking the first T.T. collection 50p coin. As you can see from pictures below, a small “hump” was used to cover up the first three REA of REARACING (the letters was originally supposed to be “REARACING”). It is very unclear that this hump was done by intension or dispute or economic situation in 1981. But having seen the small hump from pictures below, it really tells people that the Mint made it by intension for sure. This “accident” it is easy to remind collectors WHY did not they correct and recall and re-create a correct reverse die for a commemorative 50p in 1981? However, this mistake will last forever once collectors well noticed this significant difference. A real story behind bar nobody could tell and answer presumably.

1982 Mike Grant
Note
Obverse designer A. Machin
Machine: Suzuki (500)
TT on top of the reverse
Circulating Commemorative issue (AA) and commemorative issue (BB)

  • 1982 TT 50p Diamond Finish BB Coin
  • 1982 TT 50p standard finish AA coin

1983 Ron Haslam
Note
Obverse designer A. Machin
Machine: Honda
TT on top of the reverse
Circulating Commemorative issue (AA) and commemorative issue (BB)

  • 1983 TT 50p Diamond Finish BB Coin
  • 1983 TT 50p standard finish AA coin
  • 1983 TT 50p standard finish AB coin
  • 1983 TT 50p standard finish AC coin
  • 1983 TT 50p standard finish AD coin

1984 Mike Boddice
Note
Obverse designer A. Machin
Machine: Yamaha
TT on top of the reverse
Circulating Commemorative issue (AA) and commemorative issue (BB)

  • 1984 TT 50p Diamond Finish BB Coin
  • 1984 TT 50p standard finish AA coin

1996 Philip McCallen & Nigel Davies
Note
Obverse designer R. Maklouf
Why this one is related to T.T. (but for TTF1), you then have to understand first what is w privy noted in 1985. Because of the world-class famous T.T. events to Tynwald.
the 25th Anniversary of decimalisation in the Isle of Man.
NO T.T. logo.
right tail of the first A missing of AA noted, and also existed in 1997 large ones.
Circulating Commemorative issue (AA) and commemorative issue (ND)

  • 1996 50p diamond finish No die letters coin (PL, UNC)
  • 1996 50p standard finish AA coin (no mirrored-field, circulated)
  • 1996 50p standard finish AA coin from decimal mint set (UNC)
  • 1996 50p (likely) diamond finish AA coin (aUNC)
  • 1996 50p (most likely) diamond finish AA coin (semi-PL, mirrored-field, aUNC)
  • Extra: 1996 50p silver proof coin

1997 Philip McCallen & Nigel Davies
Note
Obverse designer R. Maklouf
Why this one is related to T.T. (but for TTF1), see note in 1996 above.
Echo UK coinage changes in resizing 50p coins in 1997.
NO T.T. logo
Circulating Commemorative issue (AA, 27.30mm in diameter) and commemorative issue (AA, 30.00mm in diameter)

  • 1997 50p standard finish AA coin (30.00mm in diameter)–a real collector coin
  • 1997 50p standard finish AA coin circulated (27.30mm in diameter)
  • 1997 AA standard finish 50p coin uncirculated (27.30mm in diameter)

From 1996 to 1999, the reverse was all about Philip McCallen & Nigel Davies (riders of the Formula One TT, TTF1). Also, during the period of 1996 to 1999, the Formula One T.T. theme 50ps coins were issued as circulating coins on the island. But all circulating coins were in a circle of 4-year window (see Viking Boats 50p part). Mintage figures assumed were around 6,000 coins (or less) each year. The one of the riders on reverse, Philip McCallen, became the first-and only-rider to win FOUR races in one week in 1996 T.T.–the Formula One T.T., Junior T.T., Production T.T. and Senior T.T. and almost made it for five races in Lightweight T.T.. His name was in the T.T. history book in 1996 as well. Motor machine maker was HONDA.

Part II
Information beyond this point, they are all about T.T. 50p smaller-sized coins and T.T. related coins after/(within) the period of 1997. In other words, the diameter of all 50p coins in 1997 afterwards is 27.30mm & 8.00g in weight. All diamond finish coins may come cross in this chapter. But it will be around the corner somewhere in this chapter.

If you are keen to collect IOM 50p coins, the themes on IOM 50ps circulating area coins you may have noticed are as follows:

  • 1971 to 1987 “Viking Boats/Long Boats” were struck (by the Royal Mint in 1971, the rest started from 1972 onwards to 03/2017 by the Pobjoy Mint) on 50p coins, regular issue coinage;
  • And, 1988 to 1995 “Computer Technology, PC” on 50p coins, regular issue coinage;
  • Moreover, 1996 to 1999 “Philip McCallen”, regular issue coinage;
  • And then, 2000 to 2003 “Pre-Norse Carved Cross”, regular issue coinage;
  • Last 2004 to Present “Milner’s Tower”, regular issue coinage.
  • Since 04/2017, the Tower Mint was pointed as IOM solo minter over the Pobjoy Mint.

All above stated coinages were regular issue coins and no any time gap(s) created and overlapped among 50p coin themes from 1971 to 2003 and even 1972/73/74 50ps. Note the 1972s, 1973s and 1974s were minted in 1975 for the purpose of continuity (i.e., 1972-1973-1974-1975 BU grade, 1971-1972-1973-1974 Proof grade by then). Obviously, this logic it is strongly connected before and after. Considering public information gathered, it tells us that all the 50p coins were followed by one simple rule “consistency” in time order Year by Year. However, ONLY the 1997 large-sized Philip McCallen 50p coin was overlapped between two different sizes in diameter but has the same reverse in IOM decimalisation system. It is more likely to commemorate and distinguish pre-1997 & post-1997 decimal eras on the island. Ahh, yes! It has one single commemorative 50p coin made in 1994, the Legislative Building. Moreover, the Xmas theme was started from 1980 till 2016. But this bit belongs to Xmas commemorative coin part. Dont forget to check that out! We will not reveal any info this chapter.

1998 & 1999, Philip McCallen & Nigel Davies
Note
Obverse designers I. Rank-Broadley (except R. Maklouf (1997) )
Why this one is related to T.T. (for TTF1), see note in 1996 above.
NO TT logo noted.
Currency coin (AA) and Circulating commemorative issue

  • 1998 50p standard finish AA coin
  • 1999 50p standard finish AA coin

1999 “Commemorative” coin, Yes or No??!!
In 1949, Isle of Man T.T. races became part of FIM Road Racing World Championship. In 1999, Isle of Man T.T. races celebrates its 50th anniversary and commemorates rider Robert “Les” Graham riding with 500cc AJS “Porcupine”. Whether this coin is a commemorative coin or not, it seems to people that it is not easy to answer it. If you consider a fact that regular issue coinage is in place alongside 1999 50p ones, so this type of 50p coin is a commemorative coin automatically, a very rare commemorative coin.

1999 “T.T.-related Commemorative” 50p coin
Note
Obverse designers I. Rank-Broadley (IRB)
NO T.T. logo
IOM T.T. races became part of FIM ROAD RACING WORLD CHAMPIONSHIP GRAND PRIX held since 1949 in the Isle of Man (the 50th Anni.)
Commemorative issue

  • 1999 50p diamond finish AA coin (made in 1990s from a FDC cover)
  • 1999 50p diamond finish AA coin (made in 2010s from the Mint direct)
  • A Comparison of the AA die marks above

2004 The Trophy
Note
Obverse designer I. Rank-Broadley (IRB),
The TT logo next to the trophy
Circulating commemorative issue

  • 2004 TT 50p standard finish AA coin (i.e., UNcirculated)
  • 2004 TT 50p standard finish AA coin (i.e., circulated)

2007 The Trophy and Sidecar
In this year, two 50ps exist, and both to celebrate the 100th Anni. of The T.T. on island.
Note
Either the trophy or sidecar obverses designers I. Rank-Broadley (IRB)
the trophy as exact SAME as the 2004 one
sidecar noted “100 YEARS”
T.T. logo both noted.
Circulating commemorative issue (AA)

>>2007 Type I: the Trophy

  • 2007 TT 50p diamond finish ND Coin, the Trophy
  • 2007 TT 50p standard finish AA coin

>>2007 Type II: sidecar

  • 2007 TT 50p diamond finish ND Coin, Sidecar
  • 2007 TT 50p standard finish AA coin, Sidecar

2009 Honda’s 50th Anniversary of world championship racing
Note
Obverse designer I. Rank-Broadley (IRB)
The Honda Wing logo & the 2009 TT logo noted.
The rider on coin: J McGuinness on a CBR1000RR Fireblade from his record breaking lap in 2007.
Circulating commemorative (AA) issue and commemorative (ND) issue

  • 2009 TT 50p diamond finish ND coin, Honda’s 50th Anni. of world championship racing
  • 2009 TT 50p standard finish AA coin, Honda’s 50th Anni. of world championship racing

2010 Suzuki’s 50th Anni. of its international racing
Note
Obverse designer I. Rank-Broadley (IRB)
The 2010 TT logo noted
The rider on coin Mitsuo Ito (JPN) on a Suzuki to victory in the 1963 50cc TT
Circulating Commemorative (AA) issue and commemorative (ND) issue

  • 2010 TT 50p diamond finish ND Coin, Suzuki’s 50th Anni. of its international racing
  • 2010 TT 50p standard finish AA coin, Suzuki’s 50th Anni. of its international racing

2011 Yamaha at T.T. 50 years
Note
obverse designer I. Rank-Broadley (IRB)
The 2011 TT logo noted
Circulating Commemorative (AA) issue which only one variety exits

  • 2011 TT 50p standard finish AA coin, 50 years of Yamaha at the T.T. (high grade)
  • 2011 TT 50p standard finish AA coin, 50 years of Yamaha at the T.T. (low grade)

2012 Enduro Motorcycle
Note
“Enduro Motorcycle” noted
obverse designer I. Rank-Broadley (IRB)
Motor cross (off-road racing)
Rider David Knight (IOM)
3-event held in the UK 2012 are as follows:

  • a). 2012 the Olympic Games held in London UK 2012 (Cyclist From IOM).
  • b). the Diamond Jubilee of Elizabeth II in 2012 (Queen Victoria celebrated in 1897).
  • c). Great sport events related to IOM (Motor racing famous around the islands).

Circulating commemorative (AA) issue

  • 2012 50p diamond finish ND coin, Enduro Motorcycle
  • 2012 50p standard finish AA coin, Enduro Motorcycle

2014 John McGuinness with 20 T.T. wins
Note
obverse designer I. Rank-Broadley (IRB)
T.T. logo noted
Circulating Commemorative (AA) issue

  • 2014 TT 50p standard finish AA coin, John McGuinness with 20 T.T. wins

2015 T.T. the legends
Note
TT logo noted
New theme called T.T. the Legends
obverse designer I. Rank-Broadley (IRB)
Circulating Commemorative (AA) issue
the last one bearing the 4th portrait of Q.E on IOM commemorative coinage

  • 2015 TT 50p diamond finish ND coin, T.T. the legends
  • 2015 TT 50p standard finish AA coin, T.T. the legends
  • 2015 TT 50p standard finish AB coin, T.T. the legends

2016 T.T. the legends
Note
T.T. logo noted.
The New portrait made by PM in place, echoing UK coinage changing.
PM is beneath bust back on obverse.
Circulating commemorative (AA) issue
The last one in series and like the last one of Xmas

  • 2016 TT 50p standard finish AA coin, T.T. the legends

At this point, you have seen IOM T.T. 50p coins that all are on the market through picture by picture above. No any precious coins are covered here I am afraid. This is because there is no particular value you after only mintage number. Considering the fact that circulating coin is well in place and circulating commemorative coin follows suit for the TT series for the period of 1981 to 2016, it concludes that the AA die mark is a basic point for the 50p coins struck by the Pobjoy mint after permission of the IOM government from 1975 to 2016. Coins like no die mark (indirect) or a prooflike finish (direct) are more sought-after from the IOM. A 50p coin with NO die mark is the one from 1996, and a 50p coin with a particular die mark definitely goes for 1983 (AC). Yes, the two coins mentioned have great value contained but still undervalued.

#The End