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Isle of Man Christmas 50p Coin in Grade from 1980 to 1996


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Part II

Here it comes Part II where a new part introduces how did the Pobjoy Mint make a start of the IOM Xmas 50p at the beginning of the year 1980, and a 2nd time improvement happened in 1994. We have talked many things in Part I (if you have missed is, please click here).

  • 1980 Christmas 50p coin from the Isle of Man — UNC<#1>

The 1980 UNC<#1>, BB, is the most strange one you have ever come across at the beginning of 1980, not only the BB diemark associated with but also the lowest standard in grade in a row. This one breaks the rule of prefix B equivalent to prooflike. However, it is only the one in the series.

  • 1980 Christmas 50p Coin from the Isle of Man — UNC<#2>

The 1980 UNC<#2>, BB, in contrast to the 1980 UNC<#1>, is much better in terms of finish standard. A light frosting effect and the likely mirror-liked field can be seen.

  • 1980 Christmas 50p Coin from the Isle of Man — UNC<#3>

The 1980 UNC<#3>, BC, in contrast to the 1980 UNC<#2>, is better, and great than the 1980 UNC<#1>. Also, this type of coins is named Diamond Finish (DF) officially. First impression you have is a bit more whity and easily toned in nature condition. The mirror-liked field it is getting to see clearly.

  • 1980 Christmas 50p Coin from the Isle of Man — UNC<#4>

The 1980 UNC<#4>, BD, single digit D was used for striking silver metal coin.

  • 1980 Christmas 50p Coin from the Isle of Man — UNC<#5>

The 1980 UNC<#5>, BE, single digit E was used for striking silver metal coin as well.

Things are getting more complicated beyond this point. First, mule coins exist. Second, reverse has many versions even many variants in a single version. Last, no any record for the Xmas 50p coin it has in place.

  • 1980 Christmas 50p Coin from the Isle of Man — UNC<#6>

The 1980 UNC<#6>, BF, has squared-rim especially on the obverse side.

  • 1980 Christmas 50p Coin from the Isle of Man — UNC<#6.1>

The 1980 UNC<#6.1>, BF, has the frosting effect very clear.

  • 1980 UNC<#6>'s reverse vs. 1980 UNC<#6.1>'s reverse
  • Credit: richukcoins®

  • 1980 Christmas 50p Mule Coin from the Isle of Man — UNC<#6.2>
  • 1980 Christmas 50p Mule Coin from the Isle of Man — UNC<#6.3>

At this point, you have seen many different variants including Mule coins from 1980. It concludes that nobody knew what would be the best finish for the IOM Xmas series in line with no proof coins in base metal at the beginning of the Xmas venture. One thing is clear that the young Pobjoy Mint ltd was keen to make and/or invent something new in numismatic world at age of 15 years really. Another the owner of the Mint shared the things happened behind the closed door externally with collectors as well.

Next, the turning point it shows in 1994, and was last for a consecutive 3 years period. The pattern was like AA-ND and the first introduction of No Diemark (ND) coin in the Xmas 50p series.

  • 1994 Christmas 50p Coin from the Isle of Man — UNC<#1>
  • 1994 Christmas 50p Coin from the Isle of Man — UNC<#3>

Note: UNC<#1> indicates uncirculated coin that has struck once only, and associated with AA normally. UNC<#3> is a circulating commemorative coin that is done by twice striking with polished dies and specially prepared blanks, and it has ND eventually. UNC<#2> is something between UNC<#1> and UNC<#3> and sometimes with and/or without BB diemark. UNC<#4> and beyond is more like experiments. The pattern is like AA-BB-ND in general. Once you have had an understanding of the IOM diemarks, perhaps you are going to see and enjoy how wonderful the IOM xmas series is before 2010. A third grading company like NGC or PCGS gives a mark PL+ on coin made up to 1998 and MS+ DPL/PL for 1999 and onwards. This info shows how coin quality switched off after 1999.

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Isle of Man Christmas 50p Coin in Grade from 1999 to 2016


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Part I

Here, it is a very very interesting topic to present in a way either valuation or numismatic value. This topic also is important to collectors who are keen to Christmas 50p base metal coin in modern British Isles coinage history (other than GB coin). Because the more layers we tear off, the more value you can add on the IOM Xmas series. Frankly, it is only here you are able to find out more information on what actually so-called Diamond Finish is. In the early days (say, pre-1997), a Diamond Finish standard (hereafter DF) is a combination of advanced dies (ie., polished) and advanced planchets (ie., buffed), for instance, 1980 IOM Xmas 50p coin associated with BBs-BC-BD-BE-BFs-BFs(Mule). However, the Isle of Man Christmas 50p coin made after 1999, it let you feel that collectors pay a higher price for low quality item made from normal/advanced Dies and normal blanks.

So, let we introduce a UNC coin without mentioning dies and planchets in detail first, as follows:

  • 1999 Christmas 50p Coin from the Isle of Man — UNC <#1>

From the above <#1> pictures, it is hard to tell you what is what, but a base-line point is well established. It is a normal 50p coin which you are able to find it in your pocket money. However, if you look for further detail on the coin, a AA die mark could be spotted at 8 o’clock position. Alongside of that, You are going to see NO squared-rim easily.

Still, another UNC coin, as follows:

  • 1999 Christmas 50p Coin from the Isle of Man — UNC <#2>

From the above <#2> pictures, you are going to see more details on the coin compared to UNC <#1>, but this time, a BB die mark noted on at 8 o’clock position and the mirrored-like field. A variant of UNC <#2> named <#2.1> shows a bit low quality in contrast to UNC <#2>, which is associated with no die mark (hereafter ND).

  • 1999 Christmas 50p Coin from the Isle of Man — UNC <#2.1>

let we have a close look at obverse each,

  • BB’s obverse (UNC <#2>) vs. ND’s obverse (UNC <#2.1>)

At this point, two different coins in grade are established. A UNC <#1> coin is a circulating coin, or Mint Statue (hereafter MS) grade from a 3rd grading company. A UNC either <#2> or <#2.1> coin is a circulating commemorative coin or MS Prooflike.

The last grade in a row, it goes to UNC <#3>.

  • 1999 Christmas 50p Coin from the Isle of Man — UNC <#3>

UNC <#3> is also a circulating commemorative coin but a MS Deep PL standard from a 3rd grading company.

Having said that without mentioning dies and planchets, it concludes that most importantly there were no any BUNC 50p coins made in the IOM Xmas series. UNC <#1> was under strike one time and two times for <#2> and <#2.1>, however, three times for UNC <#3>. What is more, the AA and BB die marks were an indication to tell the significant difference between circulating and circulating commemorative coins in principle. However, die marks (with or without) had less information on grades but were able to give you direct information about a xmas coin wether circulating coin or circulating commemorative coin. Obviously, it was hard to follow when the sudden appearance of the existence of ND type of coins. Therefore, UNC (or MS), DF (or MS PL) and DF with Deep prooflike (or MS DPL) were well established and defined here.

A complicated case is list below from the IOM xmas series. UNC and DF coins share the BB die mark at the same time.

  • 2000 Christmas 50p Coin from the Isle of Man — UNC <#1>

Yes, a BB die mark is easily spotted, but does not necessarily say it is a UNC <#2> or <#3> coin. The above coin is actually a UNC <#1> coin.

Now, it presents a UNC <#2> and <#2.1> coin as below,

  • 2000 Christmas 50p Coin from the Isle of Man — UNC <#2>
  • 2000 Christmas 50p Coin from the Isle of Man — UNC <#2.1>

Having said the 1999 IOM Xmas 50p coin mainly, a balanced picture needs to keep in mind. A more complicated case compared cross panel is going to be presented here in relation to same year 50p coin in the IOM Xmas series. we now have to cover the 1999 Xmas 50p coin from Gibraltar (ie., the Mint works on a same topic for two different people, ironically, the Mint has lost the right to mint Gibraltar coinage since 2004). This time, it is your turn to tell us what is it.

  • 1999 Christmas 50p Coin from Gibraltar — UNC <#2>? or <#3>?

Do not get me wrong here, the BB die mark does not say or indicate UNC <#2> in grade equally and definitely. What I have talked here is that how to identify a DF standard with and without the die marks.

We are moving to the period of 1999 to 2016 that reveals how the quality of coins drops in years.

First of all, it will be the year 2004 and then 2016 in the second place. There is a pattern of AA-BA-ND in both years when the BA die mark has been used. Meanwhile, the AA die mark is simultaneously existed in relation to the BA die mark as well. Most significantly, the Manx cat in the first place has a farewell appearance in 2004 and drops completely from the IOM Xmas series in 2005. What is more, the p has no place after the 50 denomination in 2016. This echoes back to the very beginning of the IOM Xmas series in 1980. These information are a way to express the internal side of the story.

  • 2004 Christmas 50p Coin from the Isle of Man — UNC <#1>
  • 2016 Christmas 50p Coin from the Isle of Man — UNC <#1>

The frosting effect can be seen clearly in both. However, in contrast to ND and BA 50p coins made in same years, the above coins are no better in terms of grade and even worse than UNC <#1> from 1999. A assumption is set up here that the two AA die mark coins are very specially made in the first place but reason(s) unknown.

Last, I want to mention a point here that not all AA diemarks stand for UNC or struck on base metal but there is an exception see below.

  • 1994 Christmas 50p Silver Proof Coin from Gibraltar — PF <#4>
  • Credit: NGC database/online

The mystery of the IOM and GIB Xmas 50p coin is not bad and pulling out from the water, but exploring is still on.

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Gibraltar Christmas 50p Coin From 1988 to 2003


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The 50p Xmas coin market in the UK is still young and takes time to become a good and reasonable market. However, Christmas 50p coin from Gibraltar is getting a mess and slowly moving on to their £2 coin like the Isle of Man. The sooner or later collectors will go back for obtaining original ones definitely. This is the destiny of Xmas-theme related coin — failure vs. commercialisation. Firstly, the concept of a Xmas coin is no longer a potential financial instrument as it was. Because the issuer has the absolute right in control of a mintage number. What is more, collectors are being treated like milk cows. Furthermore, people can re-sell goods in hands at a higher price on a secondary market after the IPO (i.e., initial public offering) for the purpose of quick bucks where is only the stimulus driven people to do so. If you take some time to wait a bit further, all will slow down and even be collapsed in price. Collectors have not learnt from this market and events held in the past, history will repeat itself many times, website crash down after website crash down, again and again. Last, it is inconsistency in the entire GIB Xmas series. From Day 1 to date, the Gibraltar government have employed two mints, as follows:

1988 to 2003, the Pobjoy mint;

And,

2004 to 2016, the Tower mint;

And,

2017 to 2019, back to the Pobjoy mint;

And,

2020 to day, back to the Tower mint again.

The above changes lead designs of coinage and striking quality are poor over time.

However, in contrast to Christmas 50p coin from the Isle of Man, the government of the Isle of Man is doing much better. One thing you obviously see through from the IOM Xmas series is consistency, of course, 2015 not counted. At some degree, the entire IOM Xmas series is a good investment portfolio in the long run term. Sadly, the full stop has been made in 2017 by the Tynwald Court. The IOM Xmas 50p series went commercial once in 2003, they felt good, and went twice in 2008, still good, and sadly burst in 2014.

Here, you are only able to see Gibraltar Xmas 50p coin from 1988 to 2003 ONLY, due to the main constraint of data made available by the Pobjoy Mint. Let we start with 1988 first as follows:

  • 1988 Gibraltar Xmas 50p UNC coin
  • We have to talk about a 1988 Gibraltar £1 Virenium Proof coin when we come across the very first Gibraltar Xmas 50p coin. In theory, a die mark can be easily spotted on Xmas 50p coins made by the Pobjoy Mint. However, it has no such sign. Secondly, the very first Gibraltar Xmas 50p coin is made really poor in terms of coin quality. These coins are not classified as a Diamond Finish standard coin. Bear in mind that this is not what I am defining it, and all evidence will be merged in 1989 onwards to 2003.

  • 1988 Gibraltar £1 Virenium Proof Coin

After this point, you are able to see so-called Diamond Finish (DF) 50p coin from Gibraltar. Note all samples you are going to see were acquired from coin in card.

  • 1989 Gibraltar Xmas 50p Diamond Finish (DF) coin
  • 1990 Gibraltar Xmas 50p DF coin
  • 1991 Gibraltar Xmas 50p DF coin
  • 1992 Gibraltar Xmas 50p DF coin
  • 1993 Gibraltar Xmas 50p DF coin
  • 1994 Gibraltar Xmas 50p DF coin
  • 1995 Gibraltar Xmas 50p DF coin
  • 1996 Gibraltar Xmas 50p DF coin
  • 1997 Gibraltar Xmas 50p DF coin
  • 1998 Gibraltar Xmas 50p DF coin
  • 1999 Gibraltar Xmas 50p DF coin

After this point, you are going to see designs are NOT nested in a wreath which means a full design on reverse.

  • 2000 Gibraltar Xmas 50p DF coin
  • 2001 Gibraltar Xmas 50p DF coin
  • 2002 Gibraltar Xmas 50p DF coin
  • 2003 Gibraltar Xmas 50p DF coin

Each year, 30,000 Gibraltar Xmas 50p coins are commissioned based on COA. The number of 30,000 is a maximum no. that the Mint is allowed to mint coins. Note the Mint itself has is a unique position in this case, because the Mint is a private limited company not any government-owned minter. From the perspective of the Pobjoy Mint, the level of a certain number of coins made is fundamentally important.

I am aware that it is only a short part of Gibraltar Xmas series from 1988 to 2020 (so far, 1993 and 2002 missing as well). The above coins illustrated are minted by the Pobjoy Mint. This is the reason that this short part exists. Xmas series either from the Isle of Man or Gibraltar are really good numismatic products in terms of design and technique. In modern time, it is hard to find such good arts designed by heart and made by modern people with no commercial intension first.

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Royal Mint 50p coin Kew Gardens 2009 in NGC holder


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Royal Mint 50p coin Kew Gardens 2009 in NGC holder





How to store your coin collection? It is not easy to get around this topic. First, put all your coins into coin capsules, nice and neat, most importantly, a cost efficient way. However, if you are keen to give your coins extra value added on, a third grading company is the best choice in the first place. This will make a far away long debate, whether you need to do it or not, but it is your coin and your call if costs are not counted.

Today, we are going to illustrate a coin where is chosen from NGC database. Also this coin is a bit controversial. Let we have a look this coin first.

  • 2009 Kew Gardens 50p BUNC coin, NGC slabbed MS69 DPL
  • Credit: NGC database/online

One more, same kind but graded not as good as like the first one where you have seen above, as follows,

  • 2009 Kew Gardens 50p BUNC Coin, NGC slabbed MS66 DPL
  • Credit: NGC database/online

If you want to have a HD picture, no worries, just simply take id no. down on a piece of paper next to you and type them in NGC website. Bingo! Cost effect — upside.

The two coins shown are both graded as Mint State with Deep Prooflike (ie., strike type) by NGC. This is also the interesting point we are going to say here.

As of an announcement made in 2014 by the Royal Mint, only 210,000 Kew Gardens 50p coins were issued in circulation. All Kew Gardens 50p coin-related increased a lot in value and in any way like the two coins above. However, people understood the news a bit wrong. Because circulation Kew Gardens 50p coin and non-circulating Kew Gardens 50p coin are not a same thing in this case. It clearly shows the results from the grading company–DPL. Right now, it is really hard to obtain a MS60+ this kind coin if graded by NGC. All MS60+ w/ DPL come from decimal year mint set and/or PNC cover and/or single pack etc. Highly possibly, a MS60+ grade (ie., MS65 and above) could only come from a sealed bag of 20 coins where a few people collect sealed bag coins.

At this point, if you donot follow what are we talking about here. I am going to give your a different coin from the same grader in terms of MS60+.

Please have a look at the coin as follows:

  • 2009 Blue Peter 50p UNC coin, NGC slabbed MS68
  • Credit: NGC database/online

A Blue Peter 50p UNC coin, in any way, it is a very rare coin technically and holds a value very much high as time flies by. Only a few was issued for circulation, but in this case, for retail sales purpose ONLY. And this one is far better than 1992/93 EEC 50p coin in terms of mintage. Why the Royal Mint are not saying anything about Blue Peter 2009? The rest of story, you and me all know it. A Blue Peter 50p (2009) coin in folder was sold for £311 online platform based on data in Jan of 2021. A MS69 coin slabbed by NGC is nice and popular and hot, but hard to get a MS70 from NGC or another. A Blue Peter 50p UNC coin in original folder, cut or keep, this question comes back to you again — YOUR CALL! However, according to NGC database, a MS+PL coin is also graded within this kind. It can be understood that the Royal Mint striking quality is world-class even one strike. To sum up, NGC has results graded like MS+ & MS+PL among Blue Peter and MS+DPL among Kew Gardens on 50p coins in 2009. If you have a big sample size, say 10x Blue Peter or more, you could do it if costs are not counted, and Good Luck!

Disclaim:
I dont own any coins illustrated here, and public information was used to create this post. And I donot get any advantage by publishing a slabbed coin by a third grading company.

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2009 UK 50p Coin Blue Peter and 2018 Royal Mint Experience Newton Strike Your Own 50p coin


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UK Royal Mint 50p coin in circulation the rarest ones



Two 50p coins we are going to cover here, are a 2009 50p Blue Peter coin and a 2018 50p Newton coin. We set up our benchmark by using the 2009 50p Kew Gardens coin in order to see what is the rare coin within a 50p coin group from 1971 to present. For presenting a best picture of the rarest UK 50p coin in circulation, we must firstly define two base lines of term of rarity: a). mintage and b). statue of a coin: in current circulation where the coin is not out of date in decimalisation system. Therefore, we can talk more on a same topic.

Scenario I and II are used to illustrate the two base lines the above mentioned, and each scenario case followed by a supportive table.

Scenario I: consider mintage only!
A mintage figure is important. A coin is naturally connected with its mintage. Coins are minted in place for daily use by a Mint. It is really hard to say how many coins a Mint needs to get prepared in advance, because demand is really hard to predict, due to many factors involved and cashless is getting more clear in our daily life in post-pandemic period.

In this part, we are going to list the rarest 50p coin in terms of official mintage as below:

Table A: UK the rarest 50p coin by mintage from 1971 to present
Name Year Mintage Note
the Single Market EEC 1992/93 109,000 30.00mm & 16.00g, UNC
Kew Gardens 2009 210,000 27.30mm & 8.00g, UNC
Blue Peter 2009 19,751 no official figure, UNC in folder
Isaac Newton 2018 20,826 Royal Mint Experience BUNC in folder
Source: created by richukcoins® on 13/08/2020.

Table A in Scenario I shows the rarest 50p since 1971 explicitly. However, there is one condition, solid condition, that cannot be removed easily — “…, currently in circulating 50p coin [from the Royal Mint announcement]”. Also, this point will be broken down into a). a circulating 50p coin and b). a circulating commemorative 50p coin. Therefore, Scenario II is derived from here.

Scenario II: consider mintage upon the statue of a coin. This is the way the Royal Mint used.

Table B: UK the rarest 50p coin by hype from 1997 to present
Name Year Mintage Note
Kew Gardens 2009 210,000 27.30mm & 8.00g; circulating coin
Blue Peter 2009 19,751 no official figure, in folder; circulating coin
Isaac Newton 2018 20,826 Royal Mint Experience folder; non-circulating coin
Source: created by richukcoins® on 13/08/2020.

Table A & B are the two very interesting tables. This is because Table A is reflecting a full picture of UK 50p coin over time, and Table B however just shows partially. If there is a conflict between the logic created by time naturally and the logic man-made, which one you would follow? If the man-made logic works in any scenarios, it means everything is under control by people who set up the man-made logic, indicating MOTIVATION. At the moment, people or collectors are spending over £400 on a Kew in folder. What about a Blue Peter coin??? and a EEC coin??? This is really a good question to be asked ourself. We all are driven by the Royal Mint marketing strategy.

Let we have a look what do they look like in terms of Blue Peter and Newton SYO (2018).

  • 2009* UK 50p UNC Coin Blue Peter
    • [For comparison] 2011* UK 50p BUNC Coin High Jump

    Credit richukcoins®

    *Note: UNC and BUNC are totally different two grades in terms of finish standard.

  • 2018 Royal Mint Experience Newton 50p coin Strike Your Own (SYO)
  • Credit richukcoins®

Please, donot get confused with 2017 Newton 50p coin. The reason you are going to see a 2018 Newton 50p coin is because the Mint have to use/create a thing (/or things) to marketing the Royal Mint Experience where they spent a lot time to build. Furthermore, 50p coin was becoming a hot potato between 2016 and 2017 in the UK. Therefore, that is the reason of the birth of 2018 Newton 50p coin. Yes, donot forget that 2018 Newton 50p coin is a coin that you strike it on your own (ie., Strike Your Own = SYO) at the Royal Mint Experience. This makes 2009 50p Blue Peter coin and 2018 50p Newton SYO coin a little bit different in nature.

2009 50p Blue Peter coin and 2018 50p Newton SYO coin are both rare in terms of mintage and qualified by the term of currently circulating. So, collectors, are you going to pay price over the roof on a 2009 50p Kew Gardens coin? Answers are already in you mind after this read. Mission still carries on. However, we will not know which one will be the next rarest 50p coin. Life expects many uncertainty, keep positive.

#End


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Gibraltar £2 Two Pound Prooflike Diamond Finish Coin 2020 The Labours of Hercules (2nd issue)


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Gibraltar 2020 £2 Prooflike Diamond Finish Coin the 12 Labours of Hercules (2nd issue)


On 11th December 2019 onwards, I started to build on this thread. It aims to give you general information about the 2nd issue of the Hercules (ie., same country and same issuer and same face valued used). What a great surprise, the 12 tasks/labours of Hercules (2nd issue) (i.e., the theme) was suddenly presented in front of collectors without any marketing on the 25th of November 2019. The product release totally caused a chaos on the release days either the Pobjoy mint website or collectors. The Hercules theme was originally issued in 1990s under the Gibraltar government order by the British Pobjoy Mint maker with a face value of £2 bi-metallic coinage. Yes, it has been over 20 years since the 1st release in 1997, the new issues have nothing changed and nothing improved but instead with a so-called diamond finish standard. It is a bit ironic really here. After more than 20 years, there is no any good and innovative products showing off in the numismatic world in the 21 century.

This time, the 12-coin as a set is struck at a prooflike diamond finish standard. Each coin (or each task) has a issue limit of 1,750 coins along with a cert at a price of £12.95 (incl. VAT) posted and delivery charged, and later the final one £2 extra added up on top. You may feel this small increase is not too much, but actually it says that well done your marketing and you have got more followers. In this current climate world, people probably donot care how good numismatic product it is and what potential investment value it is, but do care that limit number (i.e., mintage).

On each release day, you are going to receive an email sent from their mailing list system that contains release information and purchase link. Using purchase link is the quick way to get on the refresh page game. This just remind me that high frequency trading in financial market. A little awkward situation is the Pobjoy Mint website not designed for this purpose, cannot handle such high volume of traffic. The 1st coin in series was sold out within 3 hours on the day without any limitation of how many you intend to buy. The 2nd and 3rd ones were sold in a problematic chaos ending and after the 3rd one, each labour was sold within a second. To collectors, they have got used that “the Pobjoy video games on”, meaning how efficiently refresh the page to load, and to the Mint, the hook has been established well at the heart of following customers and added values to their brand again.

The real value behind the 2nd issue, probably it is a prooflike Diamond Finish standard. But these re-issues will also boost the 1st issue price up inevitably. The technique of PLDF has never been implemented on £2 Gibraltar bi-metallic coin before. What is more, the government of Gibraltar and the Pobjoy Mint have both overseen re-issued coins’ advantages (ie., huge revenue), based on examples built by the Royal Mint, more specifically, like 2019 UK 50p Kew Gardens, 2009 UK 40 years of the 50p coin from 1973 to 2009 and 2019 UK the 50 years of 50p coin etc.. This way/situation can just simply be concluded that there is NO any good products or arts being made into this pool. Re-issued coins are simply promoting original coins price high over roof eventually, and more and more people get their hands on 1st issue.

The 1st issue of the 12 labours of Hercules was released on £2 face value in 1997 in bimetal and silver, and the 12-coin was completed in 2000. All coins were Brilliant Uncirculated (BUNC) coins with/out die mark AA. However, £2 silver proof coin version with gold-gilt were merely known by collectors. We have talked about this silver proof set, so you can click on here to read. Clearly, it has a gap between PF and BUNC. Therefore, the 2nd issue of the 12 tasks of Hercules was released with a PLDF standard in November 2019. If you are aware of some No Die mark (ND) coins in the 1st issue, the current PLDF coin and then ND coin has no a big difference in terms of a finish standard excluding H8 of the 2nd issue.

Below, it shows that what do we get for £12.95 at early stage and then £12.95 plus £2.95 delivery fee (note H12 sold at £14.95 plus 2.95 delivery fee)<#1>.

  • No.1 to No. 12 (eg., the Nemean Lion), the 12 labours of Hercules, Gibraltar £2 Prooflike (PL) Diamond Finish (DF) coin
  • H1PH1P

    Credit: richukcoins®

Now, let we have a close look at the very first task of Hercules 2020, £2 coin from Gibraltar.

  • No.1, The Nemean Lion, Gibraltar £2 Prooflike coin
  • H1H1

    Credit: richukcoins®

In terms of a Prooflike (PL) coin, it was defined by the Isle of Man government on the 2017 50p House of Keys “Proof” coin, an error letter saying a prooflike coin is to be struck at least ONCE upon a polished blank. Therefore, the mirror-liked field is visible (as high as better) and the reflectivity reaches a certain length like 4-7 centimeter or over. When you look at this coin, eye-appearing it shows very shiny to me, the mirror-liked field is visible, and has reflectivity on coin. However, based on the ability of minting coins by the Pobjoy mint, they still have room to get improved lately (see No. 8 frosted version this is what I am talking about).

From the market prospective, the theme of this kind of product, the 2nd issue of the 12 labours of Hercules, just perfectly fits in the gap of previously left between BUNC in base metal and PF in precious metal, and simultaneously blows away fakes on the market. One stone and more than 3 birds. However, this also is a chance to show what your disadvantages are. Firstly, it should go to website traffic width definitely.

2019 Gibraltar Father Christmas 50p DF coin is back on track in terms of coin grade and in a way of selling coins UNC, DF, AGPF, AGPDFT and AUPF, and the 12 labours of Hercules (2nd issue) is coming out. Wait, Gibraltar the world first black pearl 50p DF coin “Penny black” as well. It concludes that the Pobjoy mint have recovered from the bad divorce and are doing something to strike it back. This story is ironic and funny. It might be a story enough for tea time.

Hey, your little brother drives a super speedy boat behind you, the Royal Mint, how do you feel and how to react? With regard to the Tower mint, it is distance far behind the start line. All 3 government-hired mints are inland, 2 in England and 1 in Wales.

Each issue day story in relation to each labour after this line, it shows below.

on 21st December, 2019—H2
Here, let we have a look this 2nd coin in series. First of all, the outer packaging has no difference like 1st coin, therefore, we don’t spend more time on this. If you want to see what it looks like, you can scroll up to <#1>. In regard to certificate associated with each coin, it has no point to address its function further, indeed, it is a piece of paper and does stand for nothing. If this is true, only the issue limit number is a piece of information.

  • No.2, The Lernean Hydra, Gibraltar £2 Prooflike coin
  • H2H2

    Credit richukcoins®

The coin you are looking at is nothing special in contrast to the 1st one, just a 2 coin from Gibraltar. However, how did you get this coin? I think most people definitely have different views on it. To be short, it was wasting time to obtain one, and joy became a nightmare. And, from the perspective of collector, the more coin you get, I mean the entire series, the nasty you get involved naturally. Please Please, don’t kill this hobby especially in a way that cashless will be the final destination in our society.

The most interesting thing was the release day which was 10/12/2019, not the coin itself. The first 2-coin release days were very close. 2nd/12 was sold within hours before launch time. Even they officially said they released the last batch around 1245 on the day, the question was arose. It was highly likely already all gone. Don’t forget they shut down the www.pobjoy.com at least twice, it is very abnormal for a business. Width was set up at 3 per household per transaction initially, and people in mailing system were at least 8,000 (unconfirmed), people, do the maths.

If you placed your order(s) with the www.pobjoy.com, you would have a confirmation email (ie., invoice#) generated by them and simultaneously your money was collected by their payment merchant (ie., transaction#). Later soon in this case (actually, you should have had an order# email from them simultaneously!), the order# email you received contained your actually order associated with the transaction# (with regard to transaction#, it was erased manually in this case). Did you notice 2 elements in confirmation letter, a) the invoice# and b). at the bottom, “This email does not constitute an order until payment has been processed.” The transaction# in their payment merchant was matched with a). Therefore, a confirmation email + cleared payment, a contract was formed between buyer and seller. Actually in this case, it was a contract to seller and buyer only when the seller sent out their order# manually. Once you clicked on the last line in confirmation email, you were redirected to a invalid page of Terms & Conditions. Wait, at this stage, how nasty it was behind the dark curtain. Obviously, the www.pobjoy.com did not have competence to host such coin release.

on 14th January, 2020—H3
They released information that they were going to put the 3rd coin in series on sale during the week. However, on the days of 15th & 16th, they cancelled the planned release, because people used auto-refresh technology which is illegal to take advantage on buying coins. Therefore, the release was abort. The mint website was down and up until the 17th which was the day of game on. In the following week, they threw in another batch. This is the story about the 3rd coin. In the meanwhile, they have totally changed the way of how to release information. A big lesson they learned at least so far.

  • No.3, The Ceryneian Hind, Gibraltar £2 Prooflike coin
  • H3H3

    Credit richukcoins®

on 3rd, February, 2020—H4
they sent out notice that release of the Hercules in Feb afterwards is going to reduce the limit per person AND per household down to 2 now from the very first unlimited and then 3. It was good news to people who squeeze in the queue, and they tried the best to keep the business fair.

As usual, this one below still shows coin quality very bad, especially surface blemish on outer ring part. This fact makes me pondering the question: “What is REALLY a diamond finish standard on £2 the Hercules?” A batch of 1,750 coins per month is not a big batch of job lot, the quality of coin, however, is expected to very low unsurprisingly. What is more, it is no longer free-of-charge on delivery since 3rd coin release, meaning extra £2.95 on top of your bill. This comes down to £15.90 (=£12.95 + £2.95) per transaction. Most people donot care this sale price, because you could re-sell the coin at very high price once a coin lands in your hands. However, this move either the Mint or purchasers is damaging the sustainability of the modern numismatic market. Re-issue of the labours of Hercules, it probably follows the Royal Mint move in 2019 50 years of the 50p coin plus a gap between BU grade and PF grade among British £2 coins on the market. This move, indeed, to the Mint, creates a huge demand. Based on the fact of the Pobjoy mint reissuing the 2nd issue of the Hercules, it is most likely to say the rare GIB £2 coins made by the Pojboy Mint in the past (1988 to 2003) and now (2017 to present). How rare it is, remains unknown.

  • No.4, The Erymanthian Boar, Gibraltar £2 Prooflike coin
  • H4H4

    Credit richukcoins®

on 27th, February—H5
This one was issued at 5 mins after 9 in the morning, and formed a sign that two coins in series issued at the same month but different date.

  • No.5, The Augeias’ Stables, Gibraltar £2 Prooflike coin
  • H5H5

    Credit richukcoins®

on 17th, March—H6 & H7
The pair were issued during the Coronavirus outbreak and a national lockdown. It is really a surprise that 2 coins were issued at the same.

  • No.6, The Stymphalian Birds, Gibraltar £2 Prooflike coin
  • H6H6

    Credit richukcoins®

  • No.7 The Cretan Bull, Gibraltar £2 Prooflike coin
  • H7H7

    Credit richukcoins®

on 25th March, the Pobjoy Mint office was closed under government guidance until further notice, and resumed business on 17th April. A month later,

Back to business on 13th, May—H8 & H9
A pair again! A pair again!

  • No.8, The Mares of Diomedes, Gibraltar £2 Prooflike coin
    1. [Type I, regular version in terms of PL]
    2. H8H8

      Credit richukcoins®

    3. [Type II, frosted version]
    4. H8FH8F

      Credit richukcoins®

  • No.9, The Girdle of Hyppolyte, Gibraltar £2 Prooflike coin
  • H9H9

    Credit richukcoins®

on 25th, June—H10 & H11
Hooray, a pair.

  • No.10, The Cattle of Geryon, Gibraltar £2 Prooflike coin
  • H10H10

    Credit richukcoins®

  • No.11, The Apples of the Hesperides, Gibraltar £2 Prooflike coin
  • H11H11

    Credit richukcoins®

    >

Finally, on 3rd of September–H12
Leave one choice of a single coin to be released on the day. It has been almost 2 months since last issue day.
In the afternoon, it was out around tea time. Finally, the 12-coin set has landed on earth. It was a tough job and experience while the Coronavirus was spreading among us.

  • No.12, The Cerberus, Gibraltar £2 Prooflike coin
  • H12H12

    Credit richukcoins®

Declaration:
The coins showed above are randomly picked up.

#End


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Great Britain 50 Years of The 50p Coin


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50 Years of the 50p Coin, Great Britain decimal 50p coin from 1969 to 2019

It is a part that shows key designs in year order during the period of 50 years, in terms of reverse design only. It may come across portrait changes during illustration.

50 Years (of the 50p coin from 1969 to 2019).

  • 50p coin: Britannia 1969 (left) vs. Britannia 2019 (right) (winner in design)
    • Royal coat of arms 2013 (runner-up in design, both by Christopher Ironside)
  • 50p coin, Britannia 2019 w/o privy (left) vs. 2019 w/ 2-privy
  • Generally speaking, product quality, in terms of coin grade, is improving from very basic to (deep) prooflike over years. Nothing is worth mentioning here really. If you have a close look at the 2019 50p coin w/o and w/ privy, there is one thing you have to address, coin w/ privy grade much better than coin w/o privy. The 2019 50p coin w/o privy was taken at the Royal Mint Experience, strike your own (syo), and originally only the place where you were able to purchase. However, the Royal Mint changed rules after the big sales of 50 years of the 50p coin proof standard and silver proof standard sets. It makes the 2019 50p syo coin a bit controversial.

“New” omitted (in 1982) during 50 years.

  • 50p coin 1982 (left) vs. 1969 (right)
  • No longer “New” onwards.

2nd Portrait to 3rd Portrait (in 1985) during 50 years

  • 2nd portrait [1969, 1984] vs. 3rd portrait [1985, 1997]

GB 1st 50p circulating silver proof coin (in 1996) during 50 years

  • 50p Silver proof coin seated Britannia in 1996
    • Provenance: the 25th Anniversary of decimalisation in 1996, UK vs. IOM
    • The 25th anniversary of decimalisation silver proof coin sets, both UK and IOM, were only sold to collector in silver proof finish. Note the significant difference between the UK and IOM silver proof sets above is that UK decimal silver proof and proof and BU sets were already in place in 1996. The above UK silver proof set was sold only for the purpose of celebrating the 25th anniversary of decimalisation. Also, the two 50p silver coins here were then circulating coin (i.e., a coin in daily use). In terms of integration, the IOM silver proof set had 9-coin in a set from face value of £5 down to 1p, however, the UK silver set only 7 coins were presented. With regard to popularity, the IOM 1996 silver proof set is great in demand. According to its coa, 1996 IOM silver sets were produced with a limit of 1996 sets in 1996. At this point, it is clear to say that UK numismatic products are unpopular before 2009 and most high value denominations like £1 £2 and £5 are used.

    This 1996 Seated Britannia 50p silver proof coin with a limit of 15,000 coins is recognised by a few collectors in terms of coin valuation in British modern coins. The 50p silver proof coin is a real collector item, but people who collect modern coins are keen to commercial numismatic item for instance 2016 blue peter 50p silver coin. If you look at the 50p silver coin itself, it is simple and limited at 15000 coins.

Resized from 30.00mm to 27.30mm (in 1997) during 50 years.

  • 50p coin: 1997 large (left) vs. 1997 small (right)
    • The existence of a choice between 7-sided 50p and circular 50p in 1994

Seated Britannia went down instead by Shield (in 2008) during 50 years.

  • 50p coin 2008 Seated Britannia (left) vs. 2008 Shield (right) & 4th portrait [1998, 2015]
  • Importantly, all 50p coins made in 2000 onwards are at least a prooflike standard finish. This is a very significant improvement made from the Royal Mint. Seated Britannia closed her curtain on UK circulating 50p coin after 2008.

Commemorative 50p coins during 50 years
During the period of 50 years, a very 1st commemorative 50p coin struck at the Royal Mint and at the Pobjoy Mint respectively, from the perspective of minter and understanding numismatic products. UK, it was 1973, which UK first joined the European Economic Community. Isle of Man, it was 1978, which was the 25th Anniversary of Coronation of the Queen E II. Two “special” 50p coins are shown at Point A and B below in depth. Point A and B are two points to support Commemorative 50p coin 1973 UK vs. IOM.

  • Commemorative 50p coin 1973 UK EEC PF vs. 1978 IOM PF
  • It is a very interesting comparison between the two coins. Firstly, it is coin grade. 1973 EEC 50p proof coin was made with a prooflike standard finish. However, 1978 IOM Viking boat 50p proof coin was a real proof coin. At early stage of decimalisation, coins made from the Pobjoy mint were properly minted and the Royal mint were heading to political gift. Secondly, it has no competition internal and external in this market in terms of minters. Last not least, the Royal mint didnot fancy developing any 50p coin at the beginning of decimalisation, but the Pobjoy mint had different view on 50p coin.

Point A. Within the period of 50p years, contemporary GB history also created on 50p coins in 1973 and 1992/93.

  • 50p coin 1973 (left) (UNC) vs. 1992/93 (right) (BUNC)
  • BUNC grade coin, only from year mint set.

    • 50p coin 1973 (left) vs. 1992/93 (right) (circulating type)

    As shown above, a BU 50p coin and a circulating type 50p coin in 1992/93 are very different in terms of coin grade. And only the circulating type was limited at 109,000 coins. This coin was seized for circulating after 1997, but it was part of decimalisation improvement. A very interesting question arises in my mind, what if the London Bridge goes down, whether is or not solid point to say that 2009 Kew Gardens 50p coin is no longer a rare circulating 50p coin? What will the entire numismatic world react on this news and changes? The system of decimal coinage will not be changed and opted out over the course of time, however, people will, its mother nature. Do people care what do they collect in value?

Point B. A 1979 Isle of Man 50p base proof coin. This is a very special coin in the range of UK 50p coins. In terms of finish, it is finalised with a proof finish, earlier than Royal Mint 1st 50p base proof coin in 1982.

  • 50p 1978 Proof coin
    • 50p 1978 coin (circulating coin)

50 years of the 50p coin first release (early 2019)
50 years of the 50p coin second release (mid 2019)
50 years of the 50p coin third release, possible…? If you are keen to GB 50p coins, please go back and see 40 years of the 50p coin in 2009. But, there is nothing new and creative. It is more like a revision of 2009 job lot.

#End


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Isle of Man Tourist Trophy (T.T.) 50p Standard Finish and Diamond Finish Coins from 1981 to 2016


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Isle of Man Tourist Trophy 50p Diamond Finish and Standard Finish Coin



First of all, this topic is all about circulating and/or circulating commemorative 50p cupronickel (i.e. base metal, silver in colour; 75:25 copper to nickel ratio) coins from the Isle of Man especially the Tourist Trophy (i.e., T.T.) events on the island. More clearly, we are going to split this chapter into two subparts. One part it is about to talk standard finish 50p coin in terms of uncirculated grade. Another part will direct us to diamond finish 50p coin in terms of prooflike grade. Meanwhile, you can find out what are so-called a “diamond finish” 50p coin. All then-standard and diamond finish TT 50p coins are solely minted by the British Pobjoy Mint® which is a private limited company (hereafter the Mint or PM) on behalf of the government of the Isle of Man (Tynwald, note Tynwald you need to see Viking Boats 50ps article) from 1981 to 2016.

Normally, a standard finish IOM 50p coin with only one strike that gives a complete finish on base metal has the purpose to serve people daily use on the island. Therefore, Manx collectors can easily find a 50p coin through their daily life. All standard finish 50p coins are most minted associated with “AA” on its reverse (note AA originally called the production batch codes). For some particular cases, it may appear “AB”/”AC”/”AD” under the A batch (or Prefix A) in the T.T. series, or more special cases AA appears on silver metal. Other single die mark like B, C, D (or E or F) represents precious metals. You will have less information here. Collectors normally call them as die marks (or die letters, interchangeable). They are definitely meant some information internally. Sadly, we can tell you nothing at the moment. Based on my experience, die letters tell me that may indicate many different types of mirrors associated with different striking pressures, times of striking, etc. Why do we see such difference of the die letters among coins? It is a good point to raise. However, it never ever concludes a convincible answer, even from the Mint itself.

Diamond finish 50p coins are specially created by the Mint for the purpose of producing higher standard quality on commemorative coins to serious collectors. The concept of “diamond finish” was invented by the Mint in early 1980s (note I personally think the term was derived from “diamond cut”, because the first mint-master has very strong background of jewellery). What is a coin with a “diamond finish”? In terms of a diamond finish, it is highly likely ProofLike (i.e., PL, no official confirmation) coin (e.g., 1980 IOM Xmas 50p BC coins). More information related to PL can be seen below. Bearing in mind that all diamond finish 50p coins come with die letters “BB” on reverse and a cert (e.g., it includes IOM T.T./IOM Xmas/some IOM Viking boats) originally. Interestingly, some diamond 50p coins in the T.T series come with NO “BB” when minted in late 1990s onwards. The techniques (for instance, matte mirror, reflectivity etc) used on diamond 50p coins are very detailed and enjoyable when you hold and look at it. Because the mirrored-field (or mirror-liked field) has higher reflectivity than a normal standard 50p coin but slightly lower than any proof base metal coins made by the Mint. Last, all T.T. 50p coins you are going to see within this chapter are made of cupronickel (Copper-3/4, Nickel-1/4 and appears silver in colour).

“Prooflike (PL) coins appear to look like proof coins but in reality have not been produced using the special proof process. This may include mirrored fields and cameo devices. The scale donates the proper designation for the coin, based on reflectivity, 2 to 4 inches of reflectivity; devices must be frosted.” 2 elements of prooflike coin: polished blanks are used to strike coins, and no proof dies used for mirror-liked field and frosted relief.
– pcgs.com

“For instance, PCGS notes that Prooflike Morgan dollars require ‘clear reflection in the fields on both sides from 2-4 inches away.’ The grading company states that a hazy effect or streaks may impede the reflectivity, generally indicating a semi-prooflike condition (which does not appear on the PCGS label).”
– pcgs.com

Having said a little about a prooflike finish above, it is time to reveal what the T.T. 50p coins look like now. In this part below, it contains two parts. Part I: it is the pre-1997 section (i.e., 1969 to 1997 echoes British coinage changes, 50p coins were 30.00mm in diameter and 13.50g in weight) and Part II: it is the post-1997 section (i.e., 1997 to date, 50p coins are resized to 27.30mm in diameter and 8.00g in weight).

Part I
In total, six T.T. 50p coins exist before 1997. They are: four T.T. 50p coins from 1981 to 1984) plus two T.T. related (ie., TTF1) 50p coins between 1996 and 1997 (note, by 30.00mm in diameter, therefore 6 in total, or by 27.30mm in diameter it is 7 in total. It all depends on the way how you count them). More details for each coin are as follows:

  1. 1981 T.T. commemorates 1980 winner–Joey Dunlop & Yamaha motor. Mintage 100,000 standard finish coins (AA/AB) & 30,000 diamond finish coins (BB).
  2. 1982 T.T. commemorates 1981 winner–Mike Grant & Suzuki motor. Mintage 100,000 (assumed) standard finish coins (AA) & 30,000 diamond finish coins (BB).
  3. 1983 T.T. commemorates 1982 winner–Ron Haslam & Honda motor. Mintage 100,000 standard finish coins (AA/AB/AC/AD) & 30,000 diamond finish coins (BB).
  4. 1984 T.T. commemorates the Sidecar T.T. nine times winner–Mike Boddice. Mintage 100,000 (assumed) standard finish coins (AA) & 30,000 diamond finish coins (BB).
  5. 1996 commemorates Philip McCallen Great achievement in 1996. Unknown mintage for both standard finish coins (AA) & diamond finish coins (NO die letters).
  6. 1997 commemorates Philip McCallen Great achievement in 1996. Unknown mintage for standard finish coins (AA, 30mm in diameter).
  7. 1997 commemorates Philip McCallen Great achievement in 1996. Unknown mintage for standard finish coins (AA, 27.30mm in diameter).

More specifically, 1981 Joey Dunlop
1981 T.T. 50p coin in pictures,
Note
Obverse designer A. Machin
Machine: Yamaha (747)
TT on top of the reverse
Circulating Commemorative issue (AA) and commemorative issue (BB)

  • 1981 TT 50p Diamond Finish BB coin w/o error
  • 1981 TT 50p standard finish AA coin w/ error
  • 1981 TT 50p standard finish AB coin w/ error
  • 1981 TT 50p standard finish AB coin
  • Variation on 1981 Misspelling Error Coins, Note “RACING” only on AB die mark and BB die mark coins. However, it makes a controversial point between AA die mark and BB die mark in terms of FDM. If no any controversy involved, BB die mark lost the FDM function on IOM TT 50p DF coin, and BB die mark only left with meaning of a diamond finish.

It is clearly seeing that the Mint really made a mistake when they produced 50ps of first the T.T. theme in 1981 (seen from pictures below). But they did not fully realise the “spelling” was an issue seriously, and not negotiate with other party properly before striking the first T.T. collection 50p coin. As you can see from pictures below, a small “hump” was used to cover up the first three REA of REARACING (the letters was originally supposed to be “REARACING”). It is very unclear that this hump was done by intension or dispute or economic situation in 1981. But having seen the small hump from pictures below, it really tells people that the Mint made it by intension for sure. This “accident” it is easy to remind collectors WHY did not they correct and recall and re-create a correct reverse die for a commemorative 50p in 1981? However, this mistake will last forever once collectors well noticed this significant difference. A real story behind bar nobody could tell and answer presumably.

1982 Mike Grant
Note
Obverse designer A. Machin
Machine: Suzuki (500)
TT on top of the reverse
Circulating Commemorative issue (AA) and commemorative issue (BB)

  • 1982 TT 50p Diamond Finish BB Coin
  • 1982 TT 50p standard finish AA coin

1983 Ron Haslam
Note
Obverse designer A. Machin
Machine: Honda
TT on top of the reverse
Circulating Commemorative issue (AA) and commemorative issue (BB)

  • 1983 TT 50p Diamond Finish BB Coin
  • 1983 TT 50p standard finish AA coin
  • 1983 TT 50p standard finish AB coin
  • 1983 TT 50p standard finish AC coin
  • 1983 TT 50p standard finish AD coin

1984 Mike Boddice
Note
Obverse designer A. Machin
Machine: Yamaha
TT on top of the reverse
Circulating Commemorative issue (AA) and commemorative issue (BB)

  • 1984 TT 50p Diamond Finish BB Coin
  • 1984 TT 50p standard finish AA coin

1996 Philip McCallen & Nigel Davies
Note
Obverse designer R. Maklouf
Why this one is related to T.T. (but for TTF1), you then have to understand first what is w privy noted in 1985. Because of the world-class famous T.T. events to Tynwald.
the 25th Anniversary of decimalisation in the Isle of Man.
NO T.T. logo.
right tail of the first A missing of AA noted, and also existed in 1997 large ones.
Circulating Commemorative issue (AA) and commemorative issue (ND)

  • 1996 50p diamond finish No die letters coin (PL, UNC)
  • 1996 50p standard finish AA coin (no mirrored-field, circulated)
  • 1996 50p standard finish AA coin from decimal mint set (UNC)
  • 1996 50p (likely) diamond finish AA coin (aUNC)
  • 1996 50p (most likely) diamond finish AA coin (semi-PL, mirrored-field, aUNC)
  • Extra: 1996 50p silver proof coin

1997 Philip McCallen & Nigel Davies
Note
Obverse designer R. Maklouf
Why this one is related to T.T. (but for TTF1), see note in 1996 above.
Echo UK coinage changes in resizing 50p coins in 1997.
NO T.T. logo
Circulating Commemorative issue (AA, 27.30mm in diameter) and commemorative issue (AA, 30.00mm in diameter)

  • 1997 50p standard finish AA coin (30.00mm in diameter)–a real collector coin
  • 1997 50p standard finish AA coin circulated (27.30mm in diameter)
  • 1997 AA standard finish 50p coin uncirculated (27.30mm in diameter)

From 1996 to 1999, the reverse was all about Philip McCallen & Nigel Davies (riders of the Formula One TT, TTF1). Also, during the period of 1996 to 1999, the Formula One T.T. theme 50ps coins were issued as circulating coins on the island. But all circulating coins were in a circle of 4-year window (see Viking Boats 50p part). Mintage figures assumed were around 6,000 coins (or less) each year. The one of the riders on reverse, Philip McCallen, became the first-and only-rider to win FOUR races in one week in 1996 T.T.–the Formula One T.T., Junior T.T., Production T.T. and Senior T.T. and almost made it for five races in Lightweight T.T.. His name was in the T.T. history book in 1996 as well. Motor machine maker was HONDA.

Part II
Information beyond this point, they are all about T.T. 50p smaller-sized coins and T.T. related coins after/(within) the period of 1997. In other words, the diameter of all 50p coins in 1997 afterwards is 27.30mm & 8.00g in weight. All diamond finish coins may come cross in this chapter. But it will be around the corner somewhere in this chapter.

If you are keen to collect IOM 50p coins, the themes on IOM 50ps circulating area coins you may have noticed are as follows:

  • 1971 to 1987 “Viking Boats/Long Boats” were struck (by the Royal Mint in 1971, the rest started from 1972 onwards to 03/2017 by the Pobjoy Mint) on 50p coins, regular issue coinage;
  • And, 1988 to 1995 “Computer Technology, PC” on 50p coins, regular issue coinage;
  • Moreover, 1996 to 1999 “Philip McCallen”, regular issue coinage;
  • And then, 2000 to 2003 “Pre-Norse Carved Cross”, regular issue coinage;
  • Last 2004 to Present “Milner’s Tower”, regular issue coinage.
  • Since 04/2017, the Tower Mint was pointed as IOM solo minter over the Pobjoy Mint.

All above stated coinages were regular issue coins and no any time gap(s) created and overlapped among 50p coin themes from 1971 to 2003 and even 1972/73/74 50ps. Note the 1972s, 1973s and 1974s were minted in 1975 for the purpose of continuity (i.e., 1972-1973-1974-1975 BU grade, 1971-1972-1973-1974 Proof grade by then). Obviously, this logic it is strongly connected before and after. Considering public information gathered, it tells us that all the 50p coins were followed by one simple rule “consistency” in time order Year by Year. However, ONLY the 1997 large-sized Philip McCallen 50p coin was overlapped between two different sizes in diameter but has the same reverse in IOM decimalisation system. It is more likely to commemorate and distinguish pre-1997 & post-1997 decimal eras on the island. Ahh, yes! It has one single commemorative 50p coin made in 1994, the Legislative Building. Moreover, the Xmas theme was started from 1980 till 2016. But this bit belongs to Xmas commemorative coin part. Dont forget to check that out! We will not reveal any info this chapter.

1998 & 1999, Philip McCallen & Nigel Davies
Note
Obverse designers I. Rank-Broadley (except R. Maklouf (1997) )
Why this one is related to T.T. (for TTF1), see note in 1996 above.
NO TT logo noted.
Currency coin (AA) and Circulating commemorative issue

  • 1998 50p standard finish AA coin
  • 1999 50p standard finish AA coin

1999 “Commemorative” coin, Yes or No??!!
In 1949, Isle of Man T.T. races became part of FIM Road Racing World Championship. In 1999, Isle of Man T.T. races celebrates its 50th anniversary and commemorates rider Robert “Les” Graham riding with 500cc AJS “Porcupine”. Whether this coin is a commemorative coin or not, it seems to people that it is not easy to answer it. If you consider a fact that regular issue coinage is in place alongside 1999 50p ones, so this type of 50p coin is a commemorative coin automatically, a very rare commemorative coin.

1999 “T.T.-related Commemorative” 50p coin
Note
Obverse designers I. Rank-Broadley (IRB)
NO T.T. logo
IOM T.T. races became part of FIM ROAD RACING WORLD CHAMPIONSHIP GRAND PRIX held since 1949 in the Isle of Man (the 50th Anni.)
Commemorative issue

  • 1999 50p diamond finish AA coin (made in 1990s from a FDC cover)
  • 1999 50p diamond finish AA coin (made in 2010s from the Mint direct)
  • A Comparison of the AA die marks above

2004 The Trophy
Note
Obverse designer I. Rank-Broadley (IRB),
The TT logo next to the trophy
Circulating commemorative issue

  • 2004 TT 50p standard finish AA coin (i.e., UNcirculated)
  • 2004 TT 50p standard finish AA coin (i.e., circulated)

2007 The Trophy and Sidecar
In this year, two 50ps exist, and both to celebrate the 100th Anni. of The T.T. on island.
Note
Either the trophy or sidecar obverses designers I. Rank-Broadley (IRB)
the trophy as exact SAME as the 2004 one
sidecar noted “100 YEARS”
T.T. logo both noted.
Circulating commemorative issue (AA)

>>2007 Type I: the Trophy

  • 2007 TT 50p diamond finish ND Coin, the Trophy
  • 2007 TT 50p standard finish AA coin

>>2007 Type II: sidecar

  • 2007 TT 50p diamond finish ND Coin, Sidecar
  • 2007 TT 50p standard finish AA coin, Sidecar

2009 Honda’s 50th Anniversary of world championship racing
Note
Obverse designer I. Rank-Broadley (IRB)
The Honda Wing logo & the 2009 TT logo noted.
The rider on coin: J McGuinness on a CBR1000RR Fireblade from his record breaking lap in 2007.
Circulating commemorative (AA) issue and commemorative (ND) issue

  • 2009 TT 50p diamond finish ND coin, Honda’s 50th Anni. of world championship racing
  • 2009 TT 50p standard finish AA coin, Honda’s 50th Anni. of world championship racing

2010 Suzuki’s 50th Anni. of its international racing
Note
Obverse designer I. Rank-Broadley (IRB)
The 2010 TT logo noted
The rider on coin Mitsuo Ito (JPN) on a Suzuki to victory in the 1963 50cc TT
Circulating Commemorative (AA) issue and commemorative (ND) issue

  • 2010 TT 50p diamond finish ND Coin, Suzuki’s 50th Anni. of its international racing
  • 2010 TT 50p standard finish AA coin, Suzuki’s 50th Anni. of its international racing

2011 Yamaha at T.T. 50 years
Note
obverse designer I. Rank-Broadley (IRB)
The 2011 TT logo noted
Circulating Commemorative (AA) issue which only one variety exits

  • 2011 TT 50p standard finish AA coin, 50 years of Yamaha at the T.T. (high grade)
  • 2011 TT 50p standard finish AA coin, 50 years of Yamaha at the T.T. (low grade)

2012 Enduro Motorcycle
Note
“Enduro Motorcycle” noted
obverse designer I. Rank-Broadley (IRB)
Motor cross (off-road racing)
Rider David Knight (IOM)
3-event held in the UK 2012 are as follows:

  • a). 2012 the Olympic Games held in London UK 2012 (Cyclist From IOM).
  • b). the Diamond Jubilee of Elizabeth II in 2012 (Queen Victoria celebrated in 1897).
  • c). Great sport events related to IOM (Motor racing famous around the islands).

Circulating commemorative (AA) issue

  • 2012 50p diamond finish ND coin, Enduro Motorcycle
  • 2012 50p standard finish AA coin, Enduro Motorcycle

2014 John McGuinness with 20 T.T. wins
Note
obverse designer I. Rank-Broadley (IRB)
T.T. logo noted
Circulating Commemorative (AA) issue

  • 2014 TT 50p standard finish AA coin, John McGuinness with 20 T.T. wins

2015 T.T. the legends
Note
TT logo noted
New theme called T.T. the Legends
obverse designer I. Rank-Broadley (IRB)
Circulating Commemorative (AA) issue
the last one bearing the 4th portrait of Q.E on IOM commemorative coinage

  • 2015 TT 50p diamond finish ND coin, T.T. the legends
  • 2015 TT 50p standard finish AA coin, T.T. the legends
  • 2015 TT 50p standard finish AB coin, T.T. the legends

2016 T.T. the legends
Note
T.T. logo noted.
The New portrait made by PM in place, echoing UK coinage changing.
PM is beneath bust back on obverse.
Circulating commemorative (AA) issue
The last one in series and like the last one of Xmas

  • 2016 TT 50p standard finish AA coin, T.T. the legends

At this point, you have seen IOM T.T. 50p coins that all are on the market through picture by picture above. No any precious coins are covered here I am afraid. This is because there is no particular value you after only mintage number. Considering the fact that circulating coin is well in place and circulating commemorative coin follows suit for the TT series for the period of 1981 to 2016, it concludes that the AA die mark is a basic point for the 50p coins struck by the Pobjoy mint after permission of the IOM government from 1975 to 2016. Coins like no die mark (indirect) or a prooflike finish (direct) are more sought-after from the IOM. A 50p coin with NO die mark is the one from 1996, and a 50p coin with a particular die mark definitely goes for 1983 (AC). Yes, the two coins mentioned have great value contained but still undervalued.

#The End


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1986 – 1996 Isle of Man Christmas 50p Diamond Finish Coins in Copper-Nickel


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Isle of Man Christmas 50p coin in CN from 1986 to 1996





1986, a Horse-drawn Tram
Note
Obv. designer Raphael Maklouf from the RM.
a Manx cat
7th in series.

1986 IOM Xmas 50p Diamond finish coin with BB die mark

1987, Bus
Note
Obv. designer Raphael Maklouf from the RM.
a Manx cat facing back (echoing the 2004 Manx cat).
8th in series.

1987 IOM Xmas 50p Diamond finish coin with BB die mark

1988, Motor bike
Note
Obv. designer Raphael Maklouf from the RM.
a Manx cat.
9th in series.

  • BA die marks noted on standard finish coins. Die marks have BB-BA-AA.
  • IOM coinage change reverse’s design from Viking full-sail boat to Computer this year. IOM Viking Boats out of regular coinage commencing on this year.
  • Also under permission of the government of Gibraltar to mint Xmas 50p Coins this year 3 wise men.

1989, A Tram at Laxey Station
Note
Obv. designer Raphael Maklouf from the RM.
a Manx cat
10th in series.

1989 IOM Xmas 50p Diamond finish coin with BB die mark

1990, Lady of Manx Ferry
Note
Obv. designer Raphael Maklouf from the RM.
a Manx cat.
a man-made error noted.
11th in series.

1990 IOM Xmas 50p Diamond finish coin with BB die mark

1991, The birth place of Jesus-Nativity Scene
Note
Obv. designer Raphael Maklouf from the RM.
The first highly related with the Xmas theme.
12th in series.

  • 1991 IOM Xmas 50p Diamond finish coin with BB die mark
  • This coin is highly related to the subject of Christmas on IOM 50ps first time. According to Gregory Cameron (the designer of the last “Round Pound”), “while Christmas is based on a Christian story it is a festival for everyone; a time when we celebrate the affinity and closeness in our own families and beyond, and wish goodwill to all people”.

1992, Newspaper boy
Note
Obv. designer Raphael Maklouf from the RM.
a Manx cat
13th in series.

1992 IOM Xmas 50p Diamond finish coin with BB die mark

1993, Framed the birth of Jesus-Nativity Scene
Note
Obv. designer Raphael Maklouf from the RM.
14th in series.

1993 IOM Xmas 50p Diamond finish coin with BB die mark

1994, Wren Hunting
Note
Obv. designer Raphael Maklouf from the RM.
a Manx cat.
No diemarks exists since BA appeared.
15th in series.

1994 IOM Xmas 50p Diamond finish coin with ND die mark (a very first time)

1995, Children sledding
Note
Obv. designer Raphael Maklouf from the RM.
a Manx cat
No diemarks for the 2nd consecutive period.
16th in series.

1995 IOM Xmas 50p Diamond finish coin with NO die mark

1996, Children snowballs fighting
Note
Obv. designer Raphael Maklouf from the RM.
a Manx cat
No diemarks for the 3rd consecutive period.
17th in series.

1996 IOM Xmas 50p Diamond finish coin with NO die mark

In brief, when you look at each coin back for 1980 to 1996, you find that each coin is a vivid picture with Prooflike or beyond quality. Two coins are related with the topic of Xmas theme, and the rest of them is introducing IOM as well as the Pobjoy Mint itself. No doubt that the Mint is the great solo minter during this period and is keen to develop & issue competitive numismatic products to collector on behalf Tynwald.

#Continued


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1981 – 1985 Isle of Man Christmas 50p Diamond Finish Coins in Copper-Nickel


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Isle of Man Christmas 50p coin in CN from 1981 to 1985





1981, Harbor and Nikki Boat
Note
Obv. designer Arnold Machin from the RM.
a Manx cat, the first time appearance, is noted.
BB and BC die letters both exist.
2nd in series.


World Exclusive 1981 Christmas Double Crown. On it reverse face, the Isle of Man legal tender 1981 Christmas Double Crown illustrates a traditional Manx Yuletide custom, practiced by the fishermen of Peel. This 19th century scene also pays tribute to the fact that 1981, the centenary of National Mission to Deep Sea Fishermen, has been designated Fishermen’s Year. The design shows Peel Harbour at the burn of the century; the hills to the left and St. German’s Cathedral on the right. The boats are Manx ‘Nickeys’ under full sail, leaving harbor on St. Stephen’s Day – the day after Christmas. Their mastheads are decorated with garlands of evergreens and ribbons – a time-honoured Manx Yuletide tradition. The figures in the foreground on the quay are dress in late 19th century costume. To the right of the numerals can be seen a tail-less Manx cat. The design has been created by Leslie Linday, Cert.R.A.S.. The obverse face bears the official coinage portrait of Her Majesty the Queen by Arnold Machin, R.A..

1982, Carollers
Note
Obv. designer Arnold Machin from the RM.
a Manx cat is noted.
3rd in series.


The Isle of Man’s Third Christmas Double Crown. Carols were a feature of Christmas celebrations as early as the 15th century, and the Yuletide custom of ‘wassailing’ is probably as old. Caroling has been as popular in Man over the centuries as in any other part of the British Isles, and at no time more so than during Queen Victoria’s reign. It is therefore appropriate that the Isle of Man’s 1982 Christmas coin – on its reverse face – should depict a group of Victorian carolers. They are portrayed before a Christmas tree against the backdrop of Castle Rushen in the former capital of the island. The design has benn created by Leslie Linday, Cert. R.A.S.. The obverse face bears the official coinage portrait of Her Majesty Queen Elizabeth II, sculpted by Arnold Machin, R.A..

1983, Motor–Ford Model T driving right
Note
Obv. designer Arnold Machin from the RM.
a Manx cat is noted.
The 75th Anniversary of Ford Model T.
4th in series.


A very special version exists as stated on COA!
75th Anniversary, Ford Model T (1908-1983)
The design depicts The town of Ramsey, and the Ford Model T driving right.

Ford Motor Company (Ford, established 1903 in USA), Ford Motor Company Limited, a subsidiary of Ford.
Ford Motor Company (England) Limited was established in England in 1909, purchased by Ford Motor Company Limited, incorporated in 1928.
Ford Motor Company Limited adopted the name of Ford of Britain in 1960. (see below a special carded xmas 50p coin).

Ford Model T, the first affordable automobile. Not only showing the success of Ford but also depicting a powerful symbol of the modernisation of America’s age.

The Isle of Man ‘s Fourth Christmas Double Crown. For the reverse of the 1983 Isle of Man Christmas Double Crown the period is the 1920’s and the scene is the town of Ramsey on the island’s north east coast. Christmas shoppers are portrayed in the dress of the period, with Ramsey market in the background. In the foreground is a Ford car. Scampering our of harm’s way, to the right of the figure ‘50’, is a tailless Manx cat whose lack of posterior appendage appears to place no limit on his agility! The design has been created by Leslie Linday, Cert.R.A.S.. The obverse face bears the official coinage portrait of Her Majesty Queen Elizabeth II, sculpted by Arnold Machin, R.A..

1984, Trains
Note
Obv. designer Arnold Machin from the RM.
5th in series.

1984 IOM Xmas 50p Diamond finish coin with BB die marks

1985, Aeroplanes
Note
Obv. designer Raphael Maklouf from the RM.
6th in series.

1985 IOM Xmas 50p Diamond finish coin with BB die marks

#Continued