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Royal Mint Die Trial Pieces Auction The First Time In Its History 26th September 2021




Royal Mint Trial Pieces Auction 26/09/2021




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I have been not here for a while since last post while we are coming out from the woods slowly and safely, hope all collectors are doing good and keeping well. Today, I am going to bring you a fascinating news with regard to die trial pieces, First Ever, from the Royal Mint during Collect Week 2021. In this post, you are going to see some insights of the die trial pieces auction and how important are die trial pieces in the coining process before and after.

Let we start it with some basic terms, this is a easy step to give us a starting point of knowing die trial pieces more. Here it is the official explanation published by the Royal Mint. Generally speaking, a die trial piece is a sample piece made before bulk production.

Trial pieces are not actually coins, because as follows:
>> have not gone through the processes of A). the trial of the Pyx (Latin pyxis, small box), and B). the ratification of the Royal Proclamation;
>> have new security features added A). microtext, and B). a latent image;
>> 3 pieces for each design denomination, one for the Royal Mint Museum, as always, one for the Royal Mint itself for a running standard, and the last one is down to collector’s hand.

— Gordon Summers, the Mint’s Chief Engraver

Trial pieces were auctioned via the Royal Mint website on 26th September 2021 by the way of Hybrid (a combination of timed manner and w/ an auctioneer). It is the very first time in its history either the way of selling or offering trial pieces for sale on its own. A list of 61 lots in total were up for sale and the offering range has covered two parts on the list in terms of metal purity, 0.916 and 0.999 gold coins w/ a few silver coins. The product variety in terms of theme design had most sought-after Kew Gardens 50p coin, the Sovereign series, Three Graces from the great engravers series, of course, a longer waiting one James Bond 007 (premiered on 28/09/2021 in London) and others.

Most trial pieces up for auction were (carefully?) picked up from the limited range of the trial of the Pyx sold, meaning a Britannia New Pence 50p gold proof coin in blister matches one of many trial pieces a Britannia New Pence 50p gold proof coin, but a Celebration of Sherlock HolmesTM 2019 UK 50p gold proof coin was not in 61-lot auction. At this point and stage, on the one hand, the Mint pried a bit room on a sturdy door from the perspective of the Mint market demand. Are they going to flood the market with more to come or just one-off time? It all comes down to collector’s pocket now. At the present moment, collectors are yet psychologically hooked up by the term of Royal Mint Trial. However our data suggests clearly that the Mint are carefully cultivating many royal followers. On the existing market, the most sought-after trial pieces are the 5 kilo and 2 kilo (see NGC 5880629-001 PF69UCA) Una and the Lion (both w/o security design) in terms of weight and innovation. On the other hand, it is hard to see the direction of this type of trial pieces “coin” going from the perspective of collectors. It is a pretty new concept, like they say, First Ever. It takes time and only time can tell worth it or not if a collector is after one.

On the auction day (i.e., a second past 1200pm to 90 mins later), 4 items were unsold of 61 lots (6.6% unsold) and the total price realised £389,800 (hammer price) in 90 mins, and VAT contribution was made up to almost £78,000 plus 4% extra on top of the hammer price. Next, we present auction highlights (all excl. BP):

**Lot 7 — G50P Kew Gardens 2019 sold at 26K (prebid at 24K);
**Lot 45 — G2oz 3 Graces 2020 sold at 17K (prebid at 15K), and
**Lot 52 — G10oz 3 Graces 2021 sold at 25K (no prebid).

The most interesting part during the auction was from Lot 1 to Lot 13, not only the first 5 lots contain errors but the bidding process was in a excessive and uncontrolled manner, plus another part from lot 28 to lot 39. This two parts consist of all legal tender coins. It is like they said in title after main title “Hybrid”. Invoices were sent out after 4 or 5 WORKING days due to some system failure issues.

Is it easy to find a piece in a secondary market? How often you can see one appearance? How much the last is sold? Many many question raised, but who can tell, only time tells you later.

#The End

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Royal Mint 50p coin Kew Gardens 2009 in NGC holder





Royal Mint 50p coin Kew Gardens 2009 in NGC holder





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How to store your coin collection? It is not easy to get around this topic. First, put all your coins into coin capsules, nice and neat, most importantly, a cost efficient way. However, if you are keen to give your coins extra value added on, a third grading company is the best choice in the first place. This will make a far away long debate, whether you need to do it or not, but it is your coin and your call if costs are not counted.

Today, we are going to illustrate a coin where is chosen from NGC database. Also this coin is a bit controversial. Let we have a look this coin first.

  • 2009 Kew Gardens 50p BUNC coin, NGC slabbed MS69 DPL
  • Credit: NGC database/online

One more, same kind but graded not as good as like the first one where you have seen above, as follows,

  • 2009 Kew Gardens 50p BUNC Coin, NGC slabbed MS66 DPL
  • Credit: NGC database/online

If you want to have a HD picture, no worries, just simply take id no. down on a piece of paper next to you and type them in NGC website. Bingo! Cost effect — upside.

The two coins shown are both graded as Mint State with Deep Prooflike (ie., strike type) by NGC. This is also the interesting point we are going to say here.

As of an announcement made in 2014 by the Royal Mint, only 210,000 Kew Gardens 50p coins were issued in circulation. All Kew Gardens 50p coin-related increased a lot in value and in any way like the two coins above. However, people understood the news a bit wrong. Because circulation Kew Gardens 50p coin and non-circulating Kew Gardens 50p coin are not a same thing in this case. It clearly shows the results from the grading company–DPL. Right now, it is really hard to obtain a MS60+ this kind coin if graded by NGC. All MS60+ w/ DPL come from decimal year mint set and/or PNC cover and/or single pack etc. Highly possibly, a MS60+ grade (ie., MS65 and above) could only come from a sealed bag of 20 coins where a few people collect sealed bag coins.

At this point, if you donot follow what are we talking about here. I am going to give your a different coin from the same grader in terms of MS60+.

Please have a look at the coin as follows:

  • 2009 Blue Peter 50p UNC coin, NGC slabbed MS68
  • Credit: NGC database/online

A Blue Peter 50p UNC coin, in any way, it is a very rare coin technically and holds a value very much high as time flies by. Only a few was issued for circulation, but in this case, for retail sales purpose ONLY. And this one is far better than 1992/93 EEC 50p coin in terms of mintage. Why the Royal Mint are not saying anything about Blue Peter 2009? The rest of story, you and me all know it. A Blue Peter 50p (2009) coin in folder was sold for £311 online platform based on data in Jan of 2021. A MS69 coin slabbed by NGC is nice and popular and hot, but hard to get a MS70 from NGC or another. A Blue Peter 50p UNC coin in original folder, cut or keep, this question comes back to you again — YOUR CALL! However, according to NGC database, a MS+PL coin is also graded within this kind. It can be understood that the Royal Mint striking quality is world-class even one strike. To sum up, NGC has results graded like MS+ & MS+PL among Blue Peter and MS+DPL among Kew Gardens on 50p coins in 2009. If you have a big sample size, say 10x Blue Peter or more, you could do it if costs are not counted, and Good Luck!

Disclaimer:
I dont own any coins illustrated here, and public information was used to create this post. And I donot get any advantage by publishing a slabbed coin by a third grading company.

#TheEnd

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A 50p Coin of The 50th Anniversary of Decimal Day (D-day) from Royal Mint in 2021





Royal Mint 50p of the 50th Anniversary of Decimal Day (D-day) in 2021




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On the day 15/02/2021, it will be 50 years by the existence of decimalisation in British coinage since 1971. Also, this day is so-called D-day (interesting, first thought it is D-day landing, but actually stands for decimal day). In the decimalisation system, on the basis of a decimal coin set of 6 coins (from 1/2p to 50p) was initially issued in 1971, and to date a 8-coin set from 1p to £2 is in use (excluding commemorative coins).

From the moment right now backwards to D-day, probably it has been a long story over 50 years, like a 50p coin with dual-date on rev. (1992/93), a 50p silver proof coin of the 25th anniversary of decimal day (D-day) in 1996, 50p coin resized from 30mm to 27.3mm in diameter and weight from 13g to 8g as well (1997), most popular a 50p Kew Gardens coin (2009, 210,000 coins in circulation), the composer’s name Benjamin Britten on rev. with Queen same time (2013) and extra.

Things, will be covered in this article, are like a 50p silver proof coin from the 25th Anniversary of D-day, a 50p BUNC coin from the 50th Anniversary of D-day. This article aims to give you a unique view on the development of decimalisation over time. However, it is hard to see really. One technique, micro inscription is used on £1 bi-12-sided coin on 28 of March, 2017 for the security purpose.

1996 50p silver proof coin. A Seated-Britannia 50p silver proof coin comes only from 1996 silver proof coin set. This set is a 7-coin silver set that commemorates the 25th Anniversary of decimalisation. All 7 coins are minted in sterling silver (0.9250) with denominations from 1p to £1 at cost of £95. According to its COA, 15,000 sets are permitted to sell. Smaller denominations like 1p 2p are first time to see in silver from the start of D-day to 1996. The 50p silver proof coin is the key bonus of the set. From the perspective of collectors, the 50p coin is the first 50p coin in silver to keep in your collection cabinet, and the first circulating 50p coin in silver as well. Furthermore, the silver coin set has greater intrinsic value undiscovered. Because it is the first British proof coin set in sterling silver since 1911 (note 1935 1937 issues only with 50% silver).

  • Seated-Britannia 50p silver proof coin for the 25th Anniversary of D-day in 1996
  • Credit: richukcoins®

2021 50p BUNC coin. It is very interesting to see on obv. two different portraits used on 50p coin namely 2nd and 5th and on rev. a nostalgic design. The two portraits used are only on base metal.

  • Nostalgic 50p BUNC coin for the 50th Anniversary of D-day in 2021
  • Credit: Royal Mint/Online

Top row from pictures shown above, a 50p BUNC coin with 2nd portrait is ONLY available from annual set containing 13-coin at cost of £55. It is the very smart marketing strategy on the 50th Anniversary of D-day. Bottom row shows a 50p BUNC coin with 5th portrait coming from individual pack at cost of £10. Also, this type of coin is available in silver and gold as well. Eventually, it will cost you in total of £65 (exl. delivery cost) for the two different portraits.

The 25h anniversary, the 50th anniversary, they represent special occasions in our daily life. To the Mint, it is good time to make great money, and to collectors, you have to buy them from the Mint, because you never know who is going to be next Kew and not available in our change. With the development of technology, more different techniques should be exercised on coins to represent our daily life and society situation, and more circulating commemorative coins should be released to the market.

It is a bit ironic that people donot like decimal coins 50 years ago. On the mark of 50 years today, people are keen to collect them. The decimal coins have not been changed much, but people changed a lot.

#The End

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1983 Royal Mint Decimal Coin Collection 2p Mule coin





1983 Royal Mint Decimal Coin Collection 2p Mule coin





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1 Brief Introduction
Before we kick off today’s topic, let us talk something first, a modern Mule coin.

1.1 What is a Mule coin?
Here it is a quote from Coinworld’s website, (or You can click here for more details.):

A mule coin is a coin struck with dies that were not intended to be paired.

“A numismatic mule is a fascinating creature, a hybrid of two designs never meant to appear together,” Coin World senior news editor William T. Gibbs wrote in 1992. “Some are accidental in nature, true errors that any collector would welcome in his or her collection. Other mules were deliberately produced, either accidentally, out of necessity to meet coinage demands, or from a desire to produce something special (even if fraudulent) for collectors.”

1.2 What is a modern Mule coin?
Having said a mule coin above, a modern mule coin is made in 1971 and onwards in British coinage in terms of modern. Therefore, it brings out our topic — a modern mule coin.

2 A Two New Pence Mule Coin in 1983
2.1 What is it?
A 2 (Two) New Pence Mule coin is an ordinary 2 pence (2p) coin with wording of “NEW” on reverse made in 1983. In essence, it is a 2p coin from our daily use. However, this kind of 2 new pence coin can not be found from our pocket. You only discover it from Year Mint Coin Collection Martini Set. The particular reason behind this kind of 2p Mule coin and further information, you can click on here in 2.2 below.

  • 1983 2p Mule coin in Martini Set

2.2 A real and official one in 1983
Loads loads of rare coins flood into the market, due to lack of proper knowledge and information. People can claim their own coin RARE in any way. Once a rare coin named, a price of the rare coin will soar.

The 2p mule coin official announcement please click here for more information.

Information of 2p Mule coin confirmed officially, and demands of the coin on the market existed, people just want to know how much it is worth and then cash in it? It is obvious a drawback of modern coins (i.e., quick money). However, people (i.e., investors) are destroying the turnover rate fundamentally.

3 Valuation on mule coins
A 2p mule coin, it is extremely hard to find on the market in terms of rarity. Also the mule coin is escaped under stricter inspections from a government-owned Mint, a rare event it is. At this point, you can see that a 2p Mule coin has a greater value if you have it in hands. Furthermore, the more people know and recognise, the higher price you are going to sell for. However, the mule coin slowly gets seen more commonly and loses its own value contained when the Mint downgrade their quality control process and get their hands on this commercial bug.

4 Mule coins since 1971 to 2020
Mule coins we walk through here are circulating type coins in terms of legal tender, and coins struck on wrong planchet not included.

1983 2 new pence coin (correct version: 1983 2p)
We have talked this coin in detail above, please see above.

1994 £2 Bank of England gold coin (correct version: with denomination Two Pounds)
A relevant event: trail coins were in production lines for the 1997 changeover event (i.e., 50p £2).

Undated 20p coin (correct version: 2008 20p)
A relevant event: from Tudor rose to shied on reverse

2012 50p swimming coin Olympic Games (correct version: no lines over a swimmer face)
A relevant event: none, but commemorating the Olympic Games 2012 London.

2015 50p Battle of Britain coin (correct version: with denomination 50 Pence)
A relevant event: Effigy of Q E II upgrade from 4th to 5th. The Mint said they intend to issue a special one. In the end of the day, you will see how a big lie it is!

5 Others: A new trend
Keep a 2p mule coin in its original pack, or leave the coin naked, or get the coin slabbed by a third grading company (i.e., NGC, PCGS). What are you going to do? It is very personal and subjective matter to say. It is too young modern coins in terms of time.

A 2p mule coin is worth more than its face value obviously. It is necessary to put it into a proper box, and easy to present people either physically or virtually. By considering these two points, put it in a box from a third grading company is the best way to store the coin, but costs and grades are key to think about before and after. Also, modern mule coins are too young to be slabbed. If you are going to establish your portfolio, it is the best to let your valuable mule coins slabbed.

#The End

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Royal Mint 50p BUNC UNC Coin the Single Market EEC 1992 1993





1992 1993 Royal Mint 50p BUNC UNC Coin the Single Market EEC



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Before we get into this topic, I would like to give you a short introduction on a 50p coin made in 1992/93. Two aspects it will be covered, a). history and b). 50p coin re-size in 1997, as follows:

a). The UK in 1973 joined European Economic Community (EEC) as members under the Treaty of Rome (1957-1992). In 1973, the Royal Mint had issued Hand-in-Hand (representing a circle) on 50p coins to commemorate this event. Th 1973 50p coin makes the very first commemorative 50p coin in the UK. Upon the Treaty of Maastricht (1992-2007) European Union (EU) was formed for establishing the Single Market, and the UK was the presidency of the council of ministers during 2nd half of 1992. Therefore, in 1992/93, the Royal Mint had issued 12 stars around a table to commemorate the Single Market in Europe with dual dated 50p coins. The 1992/93 coin is the first dual-dated 50p coin even the very first dual-dated decimal coin.

And,

b). In 1997, all UK 50p coins with 30.00mm in diameter and 13.00g in weight were resized to 27.30mm in diameter with a weight of 8.00g. Therefore, all large-sized 50p coins were legally out of circulation. (Note, the point b). mentioned here, it is the only reason to see Kew Gardens 50p coins from 2009 were a bubble created by hyper and the Mint itself. However, the EEC small-sized 50p coin reappeared to the market in 2009, due to the 40th anniversary of 50p decimalisation set.) Meanwhile, have you noted that why all happened in 2009, and it is true that things are that coincident?

The Single Market / EEC 50p coins were made in between 1992 and 1993 (i.e., dual-dated), and only had 109,000 mintage (by official number). If collectors want to find one on the market, it would be hard because of point b). said above. People argue that we have money and not THAT hard. Wrong, wrong, wrong, absolutely! Most the Single Market / EEC 50p coins come from decimal year set (i.e., BUNC). You would never know how many 1992 mint sets were made originally. All dual-dated 50p BUNC coins create more room on the demand of looking for a 1992/93 50p coin, and all BUNC coins are making troubles even a 3rd party grading company.

  • The Single Market/EEC dual-dated 50p UNC coin from 1992 FDC
  • EECEEC

    Credit: richukcoins®

In contrast to a dual-dated 50p BUNC coin from 1992,

  • The Single Market/EEC dual-dated 50p BUNC coin 1992 from decimal year set.
  • Credit: richukcoins®

The differences between the two coins shown above are as follows:
a). Edge. FDC’s edge looks more rougher than BUNC’s edge, and nicks noted on FDC’s edge. This is due to circulating coins that are only struck ONCE and any scratches and imperfections are NOT removed and remain part of the unique appearance of the coin;
b). Mirrored field. The mirrored field of BUNC coin has a smooth surface rather than FDC’s, meaning a commemorative BUNC coin is struck TWICE.
c). Most significantly, it is scratches on a UNC coin and legend on obverse is not lightly frosted. Based on this point, how could you expect a grade like MS 68/69 on a UNC coin.

At present, the way you find a circulating commemorative EEC 50p coin uncirculated is ONLY from First Day Cover (i.e., FDC) generally. Alternatively, it comes from a sealed bag of 20 coins if you are extremely lucky. If you send your EEC 50p coin(s) either BUNC or UNC to a 3rd grading party, you only have MS status back which is a shame. Because this does not represent a true value of a EEC 50p UNC coin.

After a look between UNC and BUNC, you will make your own decision on how much you are going to pay and which one you are going to pay for.

However, this type of BUNC has changed a lot in 2000 and onwards. The mirror field has been improved a lot, equivalent to a prooflike standard. The portrait on the obverse contains a lot of details.

  1. Seated Britannia 50p PL coin (2000)
  2. Credit: richukcoins®

  3. Library 50p PL coin (2000)
  4. Credit: richukcoins®

It concludes that the Royal mint 50p coin sold in annual set is with a Prooflike (PL) finish standard after 2000. Most importantly, a BUNC coin and a UNC coin are totally different numismatic product.

#The End

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2009 UK 50p Coin Blue Peter and 2018 Royal Mint Experience Newton Strike Your Own 50p coin





UK Royal Mint 50p coin in circulation the rarest ones




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Two 50p coins we are going to cover here, are a 2009 50p Blue Peter coin and a 2018 50p Newton coin. We set up our benchmark by using the 2009 50p Kew Gardens coin in order to see what is the rare coin within a 50p coin group from 1971 to present. For presenting a best picture of the rarest UK 50p coin in circulation, we must firstly define two base lines of term of rarity: a). mintage and b). statue of a coin: in current circulation where the coin is not out of date in decimalisation system. Therefore, we can talk more on a same topic.

Scenario I and II are used to illustrate the two base lines the above mentioned, and each scenario case followed by a supportive table.

Scenario I: Counting mintage only!
A mintage figure is important. A coin is naturally connected with its mintage. Coins are minted in place for daily use by a Mint. It is really hard to say how many coins a Mint needs to get prepared in advance, because demand is really hard to predict, due to many factors involved and cashless is getting more clear in our daily life in post-pandemic period.

In this part, we are going to list the rarest 50p coin in terms of official mintage as below:

Table A: UK the rarest 50p coin by mintage from 1971 to present
Name Year Mintage Note
the Single Market EEC 1992/93 109,000 30.00mm & 16.00g, UNC
Kew Gardens 2009 210,000 27.30mm & 8.00g, UNC
Blue Peter 2009 19,751 no official figure, UNC in blister
Isaac Newton 2018 20,826 Royal Mint Experience BUNC in folder
Source: created by richukcoins® on 13/08/2020.

Table A in Scenario I shows the rarest 50p since 1971 explicitly. However, there is one condition, solid condition, that cannot be removed easily — “…, currently in circulating 50p coin [from the Royal Mint announcement]”. Also, this point will be broken down into a). a circulating 50p coin and b). a circulating commemorative 50p coin. Therefore, Scenario II is derived from here.

Scenario II: Considering mintage upon the statue of a coin.
In terms of the statue of a coin, it could be circulating or non-circulating. This is the way the Royal Mint used to trigger consumers psychologically.

Table B: UK the rarest 50p coin by hype from 1997 to present
Name Year Mintage Note
Kew Gardens 2009 210,000 27.30mm & 8.00g; circulating coin
Blue Peter 2009 19,751 no official figure, in folder; circulating coin
Isaac Newton 2018 20,826 Royal Mint Experience folder; non-circulating coin
Source: created by richukcoins® on 13/08/2020.

Table A & B are the two very interesting tables. This is because Table A is reflecting a full picture of UK 50p coin over time, and Table B however just shows partially. If there is a conflict between the logic created by time naturally and the logic man-made, which one you would follow? If the man-made logic works in any scenarios, it means everything is under control by people who set up the man-made logic, indicating MOTIVATION. At the moment, people or collectors are spending over £400 on a Kew in folder. What about a Blue Peter coin??? and a EEC coin??? This is really a good question to be asked ourself. We all are driven by the Royal Mint marketing strategy.

Let we have a look what do they look like in terms of Blue Peter and Newton SYO (2018).

  • 2009* UK 50p UNC Coin Blue Peter
    • [For comparison] 2011* UK 50p BUNC Coin High Jump

    Credit richukcoins®

    *Note: UNC and BUNC are totally different two grades in terms of a finish standard.

  • 2018 Royal Mint Experience Newton 50p coin Strike Your Own (SYO)
  • Credit richukcoins®

Please, donot get confused with 2017 Newton 50p coin. The reason you are going to see a 2018 Newton 50p coin is because the Mint have to use/create a thing (/or things) to marketing the Royal Mint Experience where they spent a lot time to build. Furthermore, 50p coin was becoming a hot potato between 2016 and 2017 in the UK. Therefore, that is the reason of the birth of 2018 Newton 50p coin. Yes, donot forget that 2018 Newton 50p coin is a coin that you strike it on your own (ie., Strike Your Own = SYO) at the Royal Mint Experience. This makes 2009 50p Blue Peter coin and 2018 50p Newton SYO coin a little bit different in nature.

2009 50p Blue Peter coin and 2018 50p Newton SYO coin are both rare in terms of mintage and qualified by the term of currently circulating. So, collectors, are you going to pay price over the roof on a 2009 50p Kew Gardens coin? Answers are already in you mind after this read. Mission still carries on. However, we will not know which one will be the next rarest 50p coin. Life expects many uncertainty, keep positive.

#The End

© richukcoins®